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Wellness Warriors

Coolibar Athletes Wellness Warriors

Coolibar Athlete Elena King

I am a Class A Member of the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Teaching and Club Professional Division. Prior to founding my golf instruction company, ExperienceGolf, I spent five years as an instructor at the McGetrick Golf Academy.  After graduation from the University of Iowa, where I was a captain for three years, I continued on to play competitive professional golf for five years.

When Common Ground Golf Course opened in 2009 my company was asked to head-up golf instruction. The Common Ground Golf Course was designed to inspire and promote the game of golf at all levels. Because of my coaching approach and ExperienceGolf, my instruction equates to enjoyment for my students and myself. Lasting relationships have been formed. State and national championships have been celebrated. Career rounds have been toasted!

Blending my experience playing and coaching golf, I offer a comprehensive approach to the game including overall performance and player development. I coach players of all skill levels from beginners to touring professionals and tailor my approach to support each individual in discovering his or her specific goals. I am privileged to coach and mentor many of the top competitive junior players in Colorado.

My many years in the golf industry under the sun, I am adamant about protecting my skin from the sun. With Colorado having one of the highest percentages of skin cancer in the United States, I constantly remind my students to wear quality sunscreen and the importance of the sun protective clothing and hats.

CWGA Experience Day May 2012
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Coolibar Athletes Wellness Warriors

Coolibar Athlete Molly Baross

Hi, my name is Molly Baross and I am 64 years old. Yes, really! I am a Master’s synchronized swimmer. I learned the sport of “synchro” as a young girl at age 14 after swimming competitively. We practiced in an indoor pool and never had to worry about sun exposure. My team placed very high nationally in the USA. Of course, synchro was a small sport then and it was not included in college programs or the Olympics, so at age 20 I retired from the sport to pursue college, career, marriage and family.

Flash forward to after having a successful career and prospering family. I wanted exercise to help my slightly arthritic body and to keep me in shape. I joined a Masters synchro team. It was wonderful to be back in the water participating in a sport that I already had some awareness of and to get such great exercise. My team, The Unsyncables of La Mirada, competes nationally at least once a year against people in our own age group. Preparing for the competitions takes lots of practice, endurance and conditioning to be strong enough to hold your breath and do the complicated movements.

In competitions, I like to join either 4-8 other swimmers for a team routine. We choose the music, the movements and are coached to perform to our best abilities. Synchronized swimming is never perfect. There are always ways to perform better, and it takes many hours of practice to come close to acceptable. I also like to swim with a partner in the duet or sometimes with two other partners for a trio routine. If I feel brave enough or have enough time to practice, I will prepare a solo routine; however, solos are very scary!

Our efforts have paid off. In October 2011, nationally, my team placed 1st and my duet was 1st also. Two years ago in Sweden, where we competed in Fina Worlds synchronized swimming, my team placed 1st, our duet was 1st also and I placed 2nd in solo. At present, we are preparing to compete in Riccione, Italy at the Fina World’s Aquatic Championships, June 9-17, and in October, for the National Synchronized swimming Championships in Florida.

Having a tanned body isn’t the same now as it was when I was 17 years old. I don’t want to have freckles and spots on my face, arms and body. I use sunscreen all of the time and coat my face. I’m excited to try Coolibar so I can enjoy my time in the water and sun without suffering from the elements.

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Coolibar Athletes Wellness Warriors

Coolibar Athlete John Barker

I began doing triathlons in 2007 as a way to get into better shape and became hooked on the sport. I’ve competed in one sprint and two Olympic distance triathlons. My plan is to eventually do an ironman.

In the fall of 2009, I began my training to do a half ironman in the summer of 2010 when I met Lee, a neighbor of my parents. It was Thanksgiving and he was going around to his neighbors delivering fruit baskets that they had put together at church. After talking with Lee for a little bit, I learned that he was dying from kidney disease and was waiting for an organ donation. Lee’s faith thru his ordeal was very inspiring to me, so I decided to be tested to see if I was a kidney donor match. We went through the transplant surgery on July 1, 2010, and it was a great success! I had some complications with pain from the surgery, so I put off training for triathlons for another year.

I am now back on track and will be competing in my first triathlon since the surgery on July 14, 2012. My training routine has become a part of my life, and competing in this local triathlon is my first step toward doing an ironman.

Ever since my wife Elizabeth began working for Coolibar [sun protection you wear] we have learned a lot about the dangers of being exposed to ultraviolet radiation. As a triathlete, I spend a lot of time outdoors, and I am appalled at how little concern there is among other triathletes to these dangers. As an athlete, I want help educate other athletes about the importance of sun protection.

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Chad Grigsby Coolibar Athletes Inside Coolibar Wellness Warriors

Coolibar Athlete Chad Grigsby

I love to fish! I have fished since I was six years old, and it gave me a passion for the outdoors. I started fishing local tournaments in Michigan when I was 17 and always had the goal of taking it to the next level. I had a job in advertising and sales for about 10 years and then finally decided to take the risk and try fishing full time in 2002. I have been extremely fortunate in being able to live my dream and fish for a living. I love what I do every single day and know how lucky I am to do it.

2012 marks my 10th year as a full-time pro on the FLW Tour – the top level of tournament bass fishing. I have 7 top ten finishes on the Tour and one win, which was in 2011 on Kentucky Lake. I have qualified for the Forrest Wood Cup (superbowl of bass fishing) four times. My goals at the beginning of every season are to be Angler of the Year, win a Tour event and qualify for the Forrest Wood Cup.

I spend more than 100 days a year on the water during practice and tournament days. Some days I spend 15 hours on the water with over 12 hours in the direct sun. It takes a product like Coolibar to protect me from harmful UV rays – I apply sunscreen every morning – but I don’t always think about re-applying, and I need to. Coolibar eliminates that necessity.

When I’m not fishing, I enjoy hunting, golfing, mountain biking and also spending time with my family and do-it-yourself home improvement projects.

Career Highlights:

Grigsby has six top-10 finishes, including a 2011 win at Kentucky Lake, on the Walmart FLW Tour and a runner-up finish at the Forrest Wood Cup in 2005…Grigsby began his professional fishing career in 2003 when he compted in his first full season on the FLW Tour.

2011: Grigsby earned his first FLW Tour win at Kentucky Lake by weighing his career-heaviest stringer (22-13) on the final day.

2010: Grigsby posted a runner-up effort on Fort Loudoun/Tellico lakes.

2009: Grigsby, who excels at sight fishing, began the FLW Series Eastern Division season with a 16th-place finish on Lake Okeechobee, which happens to be his favorite lake, and ended the year ranked 19th in the Angler of the Year standings.

2006: He registered three top-20 finishes on Tour with a ninth-place finish on Lake Okeechobee, a 17th-place effort on Beaver Lake and a 15th-place finish on Lake Champlain.

2005: In Tour competition, he finished the year ranked 26th in the AOY race and fell just short of securing a win on bass fishing’s biggest stage – the Forrest Wood Cup – when he finished second on Lake Hamilton. 2003: Grigsby posted three top-15 finishes in 2003 EverStart Series Southeast Division competition, including a season opening sixth-place finish on Lake Okeechobee, to end the year ranked seventh.

Personal:

Chad is married to Bridget and they have two daughters, Isabelle (4 years) and Avrey (2 years). When Chad isn’t competeing on Tour he loves to hunt and golf and he especially enjoys cooking for his family.

We are honored to have Chad as part of Team Coolibar and look forward to a sun AWARE fishing season. 

Chad casting
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Success Stories Wellness Warriors

Melanoma Survivor Stan

During Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Coolibar invites skin cancer survivors to share their stories with us in their own words. The ins and outs of treatment can be intense and not necessarily a fun thing to read; however hope, determination and drive to educate others play a major role in these individuals’ lives. Skin cancer doesn’t discriminate, it can happen to anyone. Prevention and early detection can be life saving! We hope you share these stories with your friends, family and colleagues. Be SunAWARE this month the all year round.

“My name is Stan Hankins, age 76, and I live in Albert Lea, Minnesota. I discovered a lump under my jaw in the fall of 2010. The tumor was surgically removed by a Mayo surgeon in Rochester, Minnesota, in December 2010. The pathology report showed metastatic melanoma that had spread from an unknown skin mole that was never found. I had never noticed a mole that looked suspicious nor had a doctor check any moles. In March of 2011 a new tumor was discovered in the same general area as the first one. It was removed along with 110 lymph nodes in my neck and cheek. The tumor and two of the lymph nodes in the tumor were again diagnosed as metastatic melanoma.

After healing of the surgical site, I underwent five radiation treatments. Each of the five treatments was equivalent to six regular radiation treatments, because melanoma is a beast. In June of 2011 a PET scan revealed tumors on the left lung. In July my doctor started me on Leukine where I self-injected the drug that has shown some success in melanoma patients. I did this until October when I had a CT scan that showed multiple tumors had developed in both lungs as well as on my liver and peritoneum. I had another surgery in October to obtain a biopsy of the lungs to determine that it was indeed metastatic melanoma. With melanoma in my vital organs, my prognosis was rather dire. I would probably live less than a year.

In November 2011 my doctor at Mayo suggested that I join a clinical trial that was just beginning. There are eleven patients on this clinical trial. The doctor had done a similar clinical trial six years ago, and two of the ten patients are alive and show no signs of melanoma. The trial is a 28-day cycle. I take a nausea pill and chemo pills before bedtime for 5 nights and then nothing for the next 23 days. The chemo drug boosts the immune system and does not destroy good body cells, and it does not make me sick at all.

After the second cycle in January 2012, I had a CT scan that showed many of the smaller tumors had disappeared, and the larger ones were reduced by 50 percent! After the fourth cycle in March, I had another CT scan that showed further reduction of the tumors, and my liver was clear of tumors. I have just completed six cycles, and I will have my next CT scan in May. My hope is that all of the tumors have disappeared. Six people of the eleven on this clinical trial have had positive results. My doctor is excited and I am. Our hope is that this is a breakthrough for melanoma treatment. I consider this a miracle. Throughout this journey, I have had prayer covering around the world. I have no symptoms, and I am feeling great.

I used to have no worries about the sun, and for many years I wore no shirt outside during the summer. Now I wear a hat and a long-sleeved shirt when I am outside. My advice would be to have moles checked out by a doctor on a regular basis, because I obviously had a mole that was the culprit and I never noticed it.”

Photo: The picture was taken in May 2011 when I finished radiation at Mayo.  They have patients ring the bell to celebrate the completion of treatment. I had five treatments that were equivalent to 30 treatments.

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Success Stories Wellness Warriors

Melanoma Survivor Sam

During Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Coolibar invites skin cancer survivors to share their stories with us in their own words. The ins and outs of treatment can be intense and not necessarily a fun thing to read; however hope, determination and drive to educate others play a major role in these individuals’ lives. Skin cancer doesn’t discriminate, it can happen to anyone. Prevention and early detection can be life saving! We hope you share these stories with your friends, family and colleagues. Be SunAWARE this month the all year round.

From Samantha Hessel

Cancer- just a six letter word when looked at purely by letters means nothing. When looked at medically means a diagnosis, hope for a cure, and a battle. When looked at physically is an organism that invades your body and life. When looked at emotionally it breaks you down, tears you apart, and instills fear, sadness, anger, and betrayal in you and your loved ones. Cancer unwelcomingly entered my life two and a half years ago when I was 19 years old. The day before my diagnosis, my family and I enjoyed a nice day together touring quaint, local shops and having a delicious lunch. Little did we know at 8 am the next morning our lives would change forever. On July 24, 2009 I was diagnosed with melanoma skin cancer at 19 years old. On August 13, 2009 I had a minor surgery to remove the rest of the mole and 1cm of surrounding skin.

I never thought at 19 I would have heard “you have cancer”. If it wasn’t for my mom pushing me to have skin checks every year I have no idea what my life would be like right now. From this experience I have learned how truly important it is to protect yourself from the sun, especially tanning beds. I am guilty as charged for using tanning beds from 15-18 years old and truly regret it. If I would have listened to those around me I may not being writing about this experience. Now I protect myself from the sun every day by applying sunscreen regularly and wearing sun protective clothing when I know I will be outside for long periods. Hats have become my new best friend. Yes, is it hard when everyone else is at the beach and not only do I feel I can’t go because of the sun, but when I do go I am all covered in clothing, sticking out like a sore thumb or hearing comments about “how pale you are”. Does it hurt? OF COURSE! I take the looks and the comments because I know in my heart it is better than hearing “you have melanoma” again and enduring a fight for my life. I use that hurt to educate in my local community and I hope through awareness people will come to understand that getting a tan and being a bronze goddess is not worth losing your life.

My challenge to all Coolibar Blog readers is educate your kids, yourself, friends, family, community, workplace, etc. about the dangers of the sun. I beg you because it breaks my heart when people lose their life to this horrible disease. Educate and create awareness so no one has to hear the words “you have cancer” especially at a young age.

Me dressed in all Coolibar in this past summer
In my homecoming dress (when I used to tan)
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Wellness Warriors

Seeing Beyond my Vitiligo

Karl Dunbar can still recall the first day white spots began to appear on his skin.

“I was in seventh grade and my vitiligo started to appear on my right hand (on my thumb) and over my right eye,” says Dunbar. “At first, I tried to hide it by wearing gloves.” During high school and his early college years, his vitiligo became more apparent. “If you said anything about my skin we had to fight,” says Dunbar.

Vitiligo is a chronic disease that causes a loss of pigment in areas of the skin. People of all ages and from all ethnic backgrounds can develop the disease. Vitiligo does not cause physical symptoms and is not contagious, but it can have a significant impact both psychologically and socially.

“When I was younger I used to wonder how I would look if I didn’t have it,” he says.

Now the defensive line coach for the New York Jets (former defensive line coach for the Minnesota Vikings) Dunbar sees he is defined by what he does, not by his appearance. “There’s not a whole bunch of us [people living with vitiligo] doing this,’’ he says. “I just hope that everything that I do, I get judged by what I do — not by how I look.”

Dunbar’s coaching record proves that he has not let his appearance hold him back. Dunbar is credited with having built one of the most stout run defenses in the league over the past several years. The Vikings lead the league in rush defense from 2006–2008 and ranked second in 2009. He also coached perennial Pro Bowl defensive end Jared Allen. The Vikings ranked in the Top 10 in total defense from 2008–2010.

On top of being a coach in the National Football League, Dunbar also thinks of himself as a wellness coach and hopes to raise awareness for vitiligo and help the general public understand more about the disease.

“If vitiligo starts at a young age, it can be damaging to a young person’s self-esteem,” says Dunbar. “Over time, I’ve grown to deal with the people’s view on vitiligo and things they don’t understand. By getting this out [the message about what vitiligo is] I hope to help kids dealing with this skin condition not go into a shell, but thrive in their social growth.”

“It’s the old saying ‘don’t judge a book by its cover,” says Dunbar.

Coolibar sun protective clothing has the great fortune to be working with Karl Dunbar to help him spread the word about vitiligo and the importance of sun protection. “Those with vitiligo need to take caution in the sun because skin burns quicker and easier,” says Dunbar. Sun protection products such as UPF 50+ clothing, which Karl wears during training season and games, can prevent over-exposure to the sun’s UV rays that can lead to health problems down the road. Everyone of every ethnic background should use sun protection, including clothing, a hat, sunscreen and sunglasses, as a part of healthy living.

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Avoid UV & Seek Shade Success Stories Wellness Warriors

Doc Learns the Hard Way to Avoid Tanning

Some stories are so powerful they need to be retold.  This blog was written by Dr. Jessica Sparks Lilley, a pediatrician who learned the hard way that the risks of getting melanoma from using a tanning bed are real! Please do not use tanning beds.  Please do not allow your children to use tanning beds.  Help pass legislation to ban the use of tanning beds by minors.

“As a pediatrician, I have dedicated much of my life to improving the health of children—thirteen years of formal training after high school, to be exact.  I’ve worked thirty hour shifts every other day, delayed my dream of having children of my own, and moved across the country for the best learning opportunities.  Amid this grueling schedule, during my second year of residency I noticed in a bleary-eyed post-call shower that a mole on my chest had changed a little.  I recounted the “ABCDs” of skin cancer—asymmetry, borders, color, diameter—and my mole was only a little larger than a pencil eraser with more heterogeneity than I remembered (meaning that it was a mix of brown and black rather than just all brown).  When I finally made an appointment with my internist (again, post-call—can’t be choosy when you work eighty hours a week), he brushed my concerns aside and refused to even look at it, instead writing out a referral to dermatology.  Six months later, the opportunity to see a dermatologist finally arose, and I found myself standing in the specialist’s office that February morning to find that the referral had never made it.  My medical training had kicked in and caused a bad feeling in my gut about the mole, so I called my internist’s office from the waiting room and even cried on the phone to get them to help me.  After much wailing and gnashing of teeth, the referral was processed and the physician’s assistant worked me into her schedule—the suspicious mole was off to pathology within fifteen minutes, and I received the call two days later that I was right to be worried—that mole represented an early-stage melanoma.

I was in my parents’ living room when I got the call.  I had traveled from Philadelphia to Mississippi for vacation.  I will never forget the way my mother cried when she overheard me asking questions about whether sentinel node mapping would need to be part of the diagnostic work-up.  I only required a wider excision, which was done that very week and (praise God!) showed no signs of metastasis.  As I sat in doctors’ waiting rooms and even as I was walking back to the operating room, I mulled over the same regrets—why did I ever step foot into a tanning salon?

The first time I went to a tanning bed, I was fifteen years old and trying to get a little “color” to look good in a dress I found to wear in a beauty pageant.  I bought eight visits, heard nothing of the risks (which were largely unknown at the time), never burned, and actually thought it was fun to have the fifteen minutes of quiet rest.  I had to beg my parents to let me go, and the owner of the tanning salon was quick to tell my mother that indoor tanning was much safer than tanning outside.  The strongest argument against the behavior in high school I heard was a bad urban legend about a girl who “fried her ovaries” by tanning.  You’d think that I would have been hesitant to step inside a device that looked like a coffin, had a dial like an oven, and was cleaned with only a dilute cleaning solution by other tanners.  Alas, I went about ten times a year after that for various reasons—prom, pageants, and even my wedding—despite being able to draw a picture of the pyrimadine dimers I was forming in my DNA as a result of UV radiation!  Strangely, I wore sunscreen and rarely went outside, especially as my training intensified.  The first time I thought seriously about never going back was after my first pathology lecture dealing with melanoma and the strong emphasis on UV radiation as a cause of skin cancer; I considered it again when a friend was caring for a patient with metastatic melanoma during our third year of medical school and lovingly warned me that I was putting my health in danger; but because I started tanning at a young age, the behavior seemed safe to me.  I rationalized tanning in every way imaginable.  After I graduated medical school, I vowed to never return lest I set a bad example as a physician.  My last tanning visit was April 24, 2007, about a week before my wedding…and two years before the cancer diagnosis that changed my life.

I am continuing to devote my life to the health of children now as an advocate to ban tanning in minors, just as we regulate other known carcinogens like tobacco.  We know that younger DNA is more vulnerable to dangerous mutations and that teens don’t yet have the cognitive skills to judge long-term ramifications of their actions.  We also understand now that any indoor tanning before the age of 35 increases the risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, by 75%!  I am appalled that I have friends who continue to go, reasoning that tanning “isn’t that bad” and is their “only vice” and “something they do for themselves.”  I’m infuriated that some idiot doctors perpetuate the myth that sun exposure is healthy and the lie that tanning beds are a good source of vitamin D.  That’s absolute hogwash.  I’m a fellow in pediatric endocrinology and know that much better sources of vitamin D are available without the side effect of deadly cancer!

I shudder to think of what would have happened to me if I hadn’t detected my melanoma early.  Late-stage melanoma is almost always fatal.  Treatments like interferon have horrible side effects and don’t save everyone.  I no longer feel safe in my own skin and feel that the quality of my life has been impacted by the fear that my cancer will recur.  The fact that melanoma is the most common form of cancer death in my demographic (25-29 year old women) is astounding, and it is unfortunately on the rise in association with more young women with a history of indoor tanning.  It’s humiliating to recount my story—I should have known better—but I hope to teach everyone who will listen three important take-home points:

1. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever indoor (or outdoor) tan!  A tan is evidence of skin damage and potential DNA mutation that can lead to cancer.  There is no such thing as a safe tan!

2. If you are worried about something with your health, there may be a reason.  Talk to your physician, and if he or she doesn’t listen, find someone who will.

3. Finally, take time to take care of your health.  We have all made an idol/status symbol out of “busyness” to the detriment of our well-being.  If you don’t take care of yourself, no one else will.

As part of my crusade, at least one later stage melanoma has been diagnosed and countless friends and acquaintances have stopped tanning.  I will keep telling my story to anyone who will listen to defeat this often preventable cancer.”

Jessica Sparks Lilley, MD

A post shared by our friends at SunAWARE.

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Wellness Warriors

“More Than Skin Deep” – This Film Can Save Lives

If you had the resources to tell hundreds of thousands of people around the world about skin cancer and prevention would you? Director and Cinematographer Stan Kozma has worked in the film business his entire adult life. He also knows all too well how skin cancer can affect people’s lives, so he decided to take action. All is revealed about skin cancer and melanoma in his film “More Than Skin Deep: Skin Cancer in America”. The hour long film examines the cultural, historical and social facets of the disease, including how the tanning craze was accidentally popularized by Coco Chanel, as well as its medical, scientific and treatment aspects.  Since 2009, the film has been broadcast over 500 times on 200 stations to approximately 500,000 viewers in addition to audiences attending film festivals across the U.S. and currently in Norway. This landmark film has so many elements that we decided to speak with Stan and get the reasoning behind his creation of the film.

Here’s a brief clip from the film “More Than Skin Deep: Skin Cancer in America.” 

                          

Why did you decide to create a film about skin cancer?
As the saying goes, “You choose some projects. Some projects choose you.” My fiancé, Kristi, a professional make-up artist was diagnosed with melanoma. After four tough years of operations and protocols, she was taken by the disease at age 35. During a brief period of remission, she and I vowed that upon her return to full health, we would do what we could to spread awareness about skin cancer. Prior to “Skin Deep”, I had produced a successful PSA campaign about sun awareness directed at kids, teens and parents. The documentary was planned as the next step.

Stan Kozma Shooting "More Than Skin Deep"

Who do you think your audience is for this film?
The audience is anyone who is exposed to the sun – which is all of us. The film is directed at mid-teen to adult. Classroom versions have been created for middle school, high school and nursing academies.

What is your hope for every person who watches “More Than Skin Deep”?
One hope is that people who watch “Skin Deep” will want a friend or family member to watch it as well. We’ve received many requests to send copies of the film to a granddaughter or younger family member who might not realize the possible consequences of their sun habits.

What was the number one point you wanted to get across?
If there is one overarching message it is that skin cancer is REAL cancer. While the film addresses basal and squamous cancers, the primary focus is on melanoma. There are two main points we emphasized. One is that melanoma is an unpredictable and very treacherous cancer that although when caught early has a 99% cure rate, once it spreads it is very difficult to control. The second is that sun exposure or early sunburns can have long term serious consequences. Your body doesn’t really ‘get over’ a sunburn. It’s not like getting over a cold. Your skin stores that information for your entire life – and we get 80% of our lifetime sun exposure before we are 18.

How did you choose people to interview?
During Kristi’s treatments we traveled from Florida to California, New York and Bethesda for consultation and treatment. We met many brilliant and caring physicians and nurses during that time. I remained in contact with most of them after her passing. When it came time to make the documentary, not one turned down the opportunity to be on camera. In fact, several made important introductions that resulted in interviews that otherwise would not have been possible.

Sun protective clothing is now being recommended as the first line of defense by many leading organizations. The movie doesn’t really address the use of sun clothing as a protection method, was this intentional?
Several of our interviewees did mention sun protective clothing. Our limiting issue was time. The film had to be a specific length to adhere to broadcast standards. We had more footage than time. Since “Skin Deep’s” initial release in 2009, there have been significant developments in melanoma treatment and in skin cancer news. Currently we are looking to revise the film for a new broadcast version and a longer non broadcast version without time constraints. The importance and advantages of sun protective clothing will certainly be included in the update.

In your eyes, has the film been a success?
The film has been successful. But its full potential is far from being reached. “More Than Skin Deep” is the most engaging, emotional and entertaining film to examine skin cancer produced to date. It can be updated and advanced as new information and treatments become available. Custom versions of the film can be created for certain geographical regions and for ages and occupations.

Do you have any future plans as a skin cancer crusader?
In addition to continuing the outreach of “Skin Deep”, I am developing a feature film which Kristi and I started writing together and which chronicles the odyssey of her melanoma journey. It is not a standard approach to the subject and the intent is to create a narrative film that will do for skin cancer awareness what the film ‘Philadelphia’ did for HIV/AIDS understanding.

To view clips or purchase the DVD, visit www.morethanskindeep.org.

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Sun Protection Clothing Wellness Warriors What our customers say

For Women with a Sense of Adventure – Travel Sun Shirt Review

Soft Adventure Travel, the fastest growing segment of the exploding travel industry, is rewarding for the spirit and intellect, yet is safe and without excessive physical demands. Linda Ballou, author and soft adventure travel writer, has hiked, biked, kayaked and horse-backed through untouched country. Most trips are with a reliable guide, but often she explores alone seeking the sustenance from nature that can only be found in solitude.  With a degree in English Literature and a published author for over twenty years, Linda’s well-researched articles have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Northwest Travel, Specialty Travel Index and she’s the LA Outdoor Travel Examiner .

Linda knows a thing or two about the importance of carefully preparing for every excursion, including sun protection. “Since I am a ‘booming boomer’ in the most likely demographic to develop skin cancers, I really must pay attention to sun-protection,” says Linda. “It’s so important that I plan to write an article on the subject in my column on the National Association of Baby Boomer Women site in January. I hope to spotlight the Coolibar Women’s Travel Sun Shirt, which contains a built in sun scarf for additional coverage on tender chest skin, and the need for sunscreen with zinc oxide as well as a wide-brimmed hat along with other skin saving tips.”

Linda also shares her thoughts about her favorite Coolibar Travel Sun Shirt and sun protection accessories she uses. Strolling the sands of Malibu, hiking the trails in the Santa Monica Mountains, river rafting and horseback riding, I need strong sun protection. I am thrilled to have this ‘Sunsational’ Coolibar Travel Sun Shirt in my wardrobe. It is light as a summer’s breeze and is sophisticated enough for street wear, but sturdy enough for outdoor activities. I live in Southern California and spend a good deal of time at the beach or hiking on the trails. This shirt is perfect for my sunny clime,” says Linda.

Linda Ballou, Expert Travel Writer

We asked for Linda’s opinion on our aire SUNTECT® fabric, which her shirt is constructed with. “My favorite feature of the fabric is the light airy feel. Plus it needs no ironing after washing. I’m glad a fabric that makes me feel so feminine can stand up to the rigors of an active outdoor life. I would give the fabric a 10 (on a scale of 10 being great to 0 being horrible) for hot weather hiking. For cool weather, I might opt for my flannel shirt, but that does not have sun protection. The fabric also didn’t stick to my skin like polyester tends to.”

“Other sun protection accessories I use include a hat and sometimes fingerless gloves. I love my Sedona Hat. It is sturdy and wide-brimmed and really does keep the burning rays off my face. The chin strap keeps in on in the strongest winds. The fingerless gloves are just the ticket for river rafting when hands take a beating from wind, sun and water. You do not lose mobility while gaining much needed protection against the elements,” says Linda.

To read more about Linda Ballou’s adventures, visit her blog and website.

 http://lindaballoutalkingtoyou.blogspot.com/

http://www.lindaballouauthor.com/

To view the sun protection items Linda takes on her adventures, click any of the following links:

Coolibar Women’s Travel Sun Shirt
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Coolibar Sedona Sun Hat
Coolibar Fingerless Aqua Gloves

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