Don’t be fooled by sunscreen labels any longer!

Apr 01, 2013 No Comments by

This April Fools, we’re not fooling around – at least about sunscreen. Almost two years after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced their new sunscreen labeling requirements (first announced June 14, 2011), we’re now seeing both small and large sunscreen vendors roll-out new labeling, packaging, and in some cases, improved products. These changes will allow consumers to better understand a sunscreen’s ability to protect against UVA and UVB sun damage, skin cancer and skin aging.

Our friends at the American Academy of Dermatology did an excellent job of outlining many of these changes:

Skin cancer prevention versus sunburn protection

On the label, you’ll see whether a sunscreen can:

- Help prevent skin cancer and sunburn.

- Only help prevent sunburn.

That’s thanks to new FDA testing requirements. For a label to claim that a sunscreen can help prevent skin cancer and sunburn, it will have to pass two tests.

1. The first test is the broad-spectrum test. This test shows whether a sunscreen can protect your skin from the sun’s UVA and UVB rays. Both rays can cause skin cancer.

2. The second test is the sun protection factor (SPF) test. This test shows how well a sunscreen protects you from sunburn. Like today, you’ll see the SPF as a number, such as SPF 30. All sunscreen must offer some SPF. The minimum is SPF 2.

New warning: For a sunscreen to carry the claim that it can prevent skin cancer and sunburn, it must offer both: 1) broad-spectrum coverage and 2) an SPF of 15 or higher. If the sunscreen does not offer both, the label will have to carry this warning:

“This product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging.”

Water resistance

The FDA will ban companies from claiming that a sunscreen is “waterproof” or “sweat proof.” This is simply not possible.

You’ll now see the term “water resistant.” To make this claim, the product must pass another test. This test shows how long a sunscreen keeps its SPF when a person goes in the water or sweats. The label also must state how long the water resistance lasts, either 40 or 80 minutes.

New warning: If a sunscreen is not water resistant, the label must carry a warning. This warning will tell you to use a water-resistant sunscreen if you are likely to sweat or be in water.

Makeup and moisturizers

You’ll see the new claims on makeup and moisturizers, too — provided the product undergoes and passes the FDA tests.

Vanicream SPF 50+No ratings above SPF 50+

A proposed rule, if enforced, will limit the maximum SPF value on sunscreen labels to “50 +” because there is not sufficient data to show that products with SPF values higher than 50 provide greater protection for users than products with SPF values of 50.

All Coolibar sunscreen brands will be making changes to their packaging to be in compliance with new FDA guidelines.  For example, Vanicream SPF 60 will be replaced by Vanicream SPF 50+. If you have any specific questions about your favorite sunscreen brand sold on http://www.coolibar.com/, ‘Leave a reply’ below or comment at http://www.facebook.com/coolibar

, Inside Coolibar, Sunscreens and Lotions
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