Sun Smarts

Summer Sanders – Let’s Get Gross

Growing up in the California sun, I was outside every day of my life swimming. I loved the water.  Formal swimming lessons began at age 18 months and I was swimming competitively by the age of 4.  Later I swam for Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA and eventually won 2 gold medals, a silver and a bronze medal at the 1992 Olympic Games. I never thought anything of the endless hours of the sun beating down on my skin while I practiced my sport year-round. For me, sunscreen was used for “vacation sun” because I never wore sunscreen during my daily swim practice routine. I do not recall being sunburned as a child, but I know I was very sun-tanned, especially during the summer months.

I was blindsided in 2014 by my first melanoma diagnosis from my dermatologist, which resulted from a mole that had been recently removed from my calf. Swimming was my life and my love, it was who I was. After this diagnosis, my relationship with the sun changed. I became hypersensitive to skin cancer and to the sun. Being outside and in the sun was something I loved so much, but then I would feel the sun and it bothered me.  My belief is my melanoma was attributed to prolonged and consistent exposure to the sun, specifically the harmful UV rays I’d been exposed to for many years due to my swim training.

While I am grateful for the doctors and surgeons who have helped me with my skin cancer journey, I have learned to become more vocal and grown stronger by becoming my own health advocate.  The little black dot on the back of my arm was something my doctor was not initially concerned with, but the nagging feeling in my gut told me it was something that should be biopsied and I had my doctor remove it.  That little black dot turned out to be my third melanoma.  Early detection is paramount when it comes to skin cancer treatment. My goal is to inspire friends and strangers to become their own health advocates.  Hearing that someone went their dermatologist after a self-check discovery of a suspicious mole is why I continue to share my story.  In support of skin cancer awareness month, I encourage everyone to become their own health advocate and make an annual appointment to have your skin checked by a dermatologist today. It may save your life like it did mine.

This May, we are getting gross. The ugly truth is that skin cancer is not fun or glamorous. We want to share the not-so-wonderful side of what happens after a skin cancer diagnosis. Coolibar’s mission is to keep the world safe from sun damage and we thank each selfless warrior for boldly sharing their story. We hope you bear with us as we share stories to provide awareness, education and spur prevention. We’re among friends–now let’s get gross.

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Sun Smarts

Beth – Let’s Get Gross

A simple, light blue button-down cotton cardigan, we affectionately called my “swimming sweater,” was my parents’ best attempt at sun protecting my delicate skin as a toddler, while I played outside in and out of the water.  Fair skinned like my dad, with freckles, red hair and blue eyes, I always remembered having trouble avoiding sunburns.

At age 8 I remember my father, who at that time worked for the NIH (National Institutes of Health), often brought home some of the first chemical sunscreen, known as “PABA” (Para-aminobenzoic acid). Dad would arrive home with a plastic, ugly brown jug. It was filled with a watery liquid that splashed everywhere, leaving a bright orange stain on anything it touched.  Our family would stand in line to “splash” the watery goo on our skin before we went outside or sailed the Chesapeake Bay. (PABA would even turn the white sails of our sailboat orange.)  PABA seemed to work, except for the fact that it would stain, streak and wash off the second we hit the water!  From an early age, I was very sun aware.  This was only because I experienced the blistering pain of sunburns, but I had no idea each childhood sunburn would “reappear” on my skin later in life.

Beginning at age 30, the damage to my skin from prolonged sun exposure was becoming evident.  My dermatologist and I knew each other on a first name basis, with the frequency of visible skin spots being frozen or biopsied during each visit.   A few excisions were necessary for basal and squamous cell carcinomas to be removed from my chest, arms and face, probably attributed my love of skiing, sailing, beach volleyball and all things outdoor. This practice felt normal and expected for someone with characteristically fair skin like me. And this dermatologic routine, of skin review and spot removal, went on for 15 years. From the first skin cancer detection, throughout the subsequent removals, I was much more diligent about sunscreen, hats, and clothing, to protect me from further sun damage, but the damage had been done.  During a routine dermatologist visit, a small basal cell carcinoma turned up. This led to Moh’s surgery on my nostril, with a total reconstruction of my nose using my own ear cartilage. This was humbling, scary and changed my outdoor lifestyle habits forever.

In early 2016, my father had extensive surgery due to melanoma, which prompted me to schedule another skin check visit.  My physician scanned my skin, remarking to the nurse, “let’s biopsy these, freeze a few, watch the others.”  While seemingly a routine visit, for some reason the freckle on my abdomen seemed newer and something in my gut instructed me to ask the doctor to biopsy it, rather than just watch it. It appeared to be was just a small freckle, but after my dad’s diagnosis, I felt I should be more aggressive about my health. On a Friday, just one week later, I was told it was melanoma. Stage 1A, so we had caught it early. Just three days after my melanoma diagnosis, I was asked to interview for a position with the Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF).  Given the nature of my very recent melanoma news, I found the timing of this call to be odd and even wondered, “could be some sort of HPAA violation?”  Within minutes I realized this call of inquiry was astonishingly the most AMAZING and coincidental timing and I was more than intrigued.  At the time, I knew very little about the organization, but I instantly understood how critical they were to this cause that was now near and dear to my heart.

I am proud to say I have been the corporate relations director of the Melanoma Research Foundation since October 2016.  Working with this organization has provided me with so much hope for what can be done in bringing an end to this disease. I realize now that I am one of the lucky ones who caught skin cancer early.  Until I started at the MRF, I never knew someone dies from melanoma every hour of every day. Reading melanoma statistics like this one horrifies me and renews my commitment to help bring awareness through my work. The medical research being done is making progress and bringing hope.  The education around prevention will hopefully turn around the trends that are showing more and more young women and children being diagnosed with melanoma that ever.  I will continue to have bi-annual skin checks, protect myself with sunscreen, hats and UPF clothing when I am enjoying the sun outdoors and fight passionately for a cure for melanoma.

This May, we are getting gross. The ugly truth is that skin cancer is not fun or glamorous. We want to share the not-so-wonderful side of what happens after a skin cancer diagnosis. Coolibar’s mission is to keep the world safe from sun damage and we thank each selfless warrior for boldly sharing their story. We hope you bear with us as we share stories to provide awareness, education and spur prevention. We’re among friends–now let’s get gross.

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Sun Smarts

Make Sunglasses Part of Your Sun Protective Wardrobe

Did you know that sunglass lens protection can diminish over time? According to the latest research on glasses, lenses can expire, like food in the refrigerator, and protection can go bad. That’s why the right lenses matter for long -term eye health. UV rays bounce from sidewalks, water surfaces and penetrate car windows, causing long-term damage, like cataracts.

Don’t forget that UVA rays dominate year-round. These are the burning rays that penetrate clouds, glass, and our deep tissue layers. They are also the culprits that cause macular degeneration and cataracts. It may sound surprising, but even eyes, like skin, can easily sunburn. If your eyes have ever felt itchy and scratchy after being in the sun, you’be most likely had sunburn on your eyes.

Having a sunburn on your eye is one thing but, there are other things that can affect your eyes too. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, eyelid skin cancer accounts for 5-10% of all skin cancers. It’s important to wear eyewear with maximum UV protection, blocking 100% of UV rays and wear a wide brim hat when spending time outdoors.

We recommend quality lenses in stylish designs that provide proper coverage and suggest the following 4 brands on coolibar.com:

Costa: Created by a group of hardcore fisherman who spent their days exploring the globe. Costa’s mission is to create the clearest sunglasses on the planet for the life’s great adventures.

Serengeti: Known for developing state of the art technology, all Serengeti sunglasses are photochromatic and constantly adjust throughout the day to changing light conditions.

Eyebobs: A line of distinctive, high-quality reading glasses for the irreverent and slightly jaded, Eyebobs was created on the notion that you should not be doomed to wander the racks of drugstore readers in search of the least offensive pair.

Kaenon: Kaenon was founded by two brothers who were unsatisfied with the sunglasses available on the market. Determined to create something better, they developed the proprietary polarized SR-91® lens — the world’s first non-compromising polarized lens. The sunglasses Kaenon created were quickly adopted by world-class athletes ranging from sailing to golf, from baseball to fishing.

Be mindful of year-round UBA and protect your eyes–and skin–from burns.

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Sun Smarts

What are ultraviolet rays?

Scientifically speaking, UV radiation is part of the electromagnetic (light) spectrum that reaches the earth from the sun. It has wavelengths shorter than visible light, making it invisible to the naked eye. These wavelengths are classified as UVA, UVB, or UVC.

UV Radiation and Skin Cancer
By damaging the skin’s cellular DNA, excessive UV radiation produces genetic mutations that can lead to skin cancer. Both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization have identified UV as a proven human carcinogen. UV radiation is considered the main cause of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These cancers strike more than a million Americans each year. Many experts believe that, especially for fair-skinned people, UV radiation also frequently plays a key role in melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. One person each hour dies from melanoma.

UVA Rays
Most of us are exposed to large amounts of UVA throughout our lifetime. UVA rays account for up to 95 percent of the UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface. Although they are less intense than UVB, UVA rays are 30 to 50 times more prevalent. They are present with relatively equal intensity during all daylight hours throughout the year and can penetrate clouds and glass.
UVA penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB and is responsible for skin aging, wrinkling (photoaging) and breaking down collagen. Recent studies over the past two decades show that UVA damages skin cells called keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. (Basal and squamous cells are types of keratinocytes.) UVA contributes to and may even initiate the development of skin cancers.
UVA is the dominant tanning ray, and we now know that tanning, whether outdoors or in a salon, causes cumulative damage over time. A tan results from injury to the skin’s DNA; the skin darkens in an imperfect attempt to prevent further DNA damage. These imperfections, or mutations, can lead to skin cancer. Tanning booths primarily emit UVA. The high-pressure sunlamps used in tanning salons emit doses of UVA as much as 12 times that of the sun. Not surprisingly, people who use tanning salons are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma. According to recent research, first exposure to tanning beds in youth increases melanoma risk by 75 percent.

UVB Rays
UVB, the chief cause of skin reddening and sunburn, tends to damage the skin’s more superficial epidermal layers. It plays a key role in the development of skin cancer and a contributory role in tanning and photoaging. Its intensity varies by season, location, and time of day. The most significant amount of UVB hits the U.S. between 10 AM and 4 PM from April to October. However, UVB rays can burn and damage your skin year-round, especially at high altitudes and on reflective surfaces such as snow or ice, which bounce back up to 80 percent of the rays so that they hit the skin twice. UVB rays do not significantly penetrate glass.

 

If you’d like to read more information about ultraviolet rays visit the Skin Cancer Foundation website.

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Sun Smarts

How much sun does a regular shirt block?

There’s a reason why UPF 50+ clothing is becoming more popular with all ages. Clothing is a physical barrier between your skin and the sun and you might as well use it to your advantage. Not all clothing is created equally. There are many factors that can make certain clothing able to block UV rays better than others. The tightness of the weave, weight, type of fiber, color, and the amount of skin covered all affect the amount of protection that a garment can provide.

UPF is different than the SPF rating. They are not used in the same way and make sure you know the difference to keep yourself protected from the sun. UPF stands for ultraviolet protection factor and is the rating system used for clothing and fabrics. The UPF indicates how much of the sun’s UVA and UVB rays are absorbed. A fabric with the rating of 50 will only allow 1/50th of the sun’s UV rays to pass through. All Coolibar clothes are rated at UPF 50+ meaning that 98% of both UVA and UVB rays will be blocked. This reduces your exposure significantly.

SPF stands for sun protection factor and it is the rating that they give to sunscreens. It measures the amount of time it takes for sun-exposed skin to redden. UPF measures the amount of UV radiation that penetrates a fabric and reaches the skin. Time allotted does not matter for UPF rated fabrics, the rating has to to do with how much UV radiation can penetrate the fabric only. Make sure to check to see if your sunscreen is broad spectrum because SPF ratings do not tell you if the sunscreen blocks both UVA and UVB rays some only block the UVB rays.

As a rule, light-colored, lightweight and loosely woven fabrics do not offer much protection from the sun. That white shirt you slip on at the beach when you feel your skin burning provides only moderate protection from sunburn, with an average ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) of 7. The sun protection lowers to an approximate UPF of 3 when that shirt gets wet.

At Coolibar, we take protection seriously. Our proprietary fabrics block 98% of UVA and UVB rays, look good, wear well, and are guaranteed for a lifetime. No detail is too small for Coolibar, starting with those teeny tiny sun-bouncing minerals embedded in every single teeny tiny fiber and crafted into sun-stopping prints and styles. Trust our UPF 50+ fabrics to protect your right to play in the sun. Our fabrics are made in a way that they remain lightweight and comfortable but still provide the sun protection you need.

Tested more than any other fabric, endorsed by experts worldwide and recommended by dermatologists. Coolibar guarantees the UPF 50+ protection from the first day our product is worn until the very last day. Our fabrics are thoroughly tested at independent labs to ensure each product exceeds our UPF 50+ standard.

Coolibar was the first clothing to be recommended by the Skin Cancer Foundation. To receive The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Seal of Recommendation, sun-protective fabrics must have a minimum UPF of 30. We consider a UPF rating of 30-49 to offer very good protection and 50+ excellent protection. Remember not all UPF clothing is created equally, pay attention to wash out, testing practices, and what UPF rating they have.

Sources:

Skin Cancer Foundation

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Sun Smarts

What’s the difference between SPF and UPF?

Did you know that there’s a difference between SPF and UPF? Both have something to do with keeping your skin protected from the sun but mean very different things. Sunlight includes rays of invisible ultraviolet (UV) radiation; overexposure to UV rays can lead to sunburn, accelerated skin aging and skin cancer. Sunscreen and clothing offer your main forms of UV protection but are rated two different ways with SPF and UPF.

UPF is the standard used to measure the effectiveness of sun protective fabrics. UPF stands for Ultraviolet Protection Factor and indicates how much of the sun’s UV radiation penetrates a fabric and reaches the skin. UPF is associated with fabric and you will see a UPF rating from 15-50 associated with products that claim that they are sun protective. A fabric with a rating of 50 will allow only 1/50th of the sun’s UV rays to pass through. This means the fabric will reduce your skin’s UV radiation exposure significantly because only 2 percent of the UV rays will get through. This also means that it blocks both UVA and UVB rays while SPF only takes the UVB rays into account. Currently, in the United States the standards for UPF are voluntary. Check with your sun protective clothing company to see if they do independent testing on their fabrics to test their UPF claims.

SPF is a standard used to measure the effectiveness of sunscreen. SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. It measures the amount of time it takes for sun-exposed skin to redden, while UPF measures the amount of UV radiation that penetrates a fabric and reaches the skin. Remember that SPF only accounts for UVB rays unless specifically stated as a broad spectrum sunscreen.

As you can see when you are trying to keep your skin protected it is important to know the different rating systems. Many skin-care experts believe clothing shields skin more effectively from UV light than sunscreen. Many of us often apply sunscreen lotions too thinly, giving our skin less protection than the sunscreen’s available SPF rating, and we neglect to reapply it as directed by the specific sunscreen that we use.

To receive The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Seal of Recommendation, sun-protective fabrics must have a minimum UPF of 30. They consider a UPF rating of 30-49 to offer very good protection and 50+ excellent protection. Coolibar was the first clothing to receive the Skin Cancer Foundation’s Seal of Recommendation. All of our clothing is rated UPF 50+, with protection that will never wash out.

 

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Sunny Places

Try Sun Protective Clothing During Your Next Snorkeling Trip

You might not know one of the important benefits to wearing sun protective clothing while you are on your next beach vacation. Certain ingredients in sunscreens can have a harmful impact on the beautiful coral reefs that you traveled to visit. Coral reefs are beautiful to visit and are the most diverse of all marine ecosystems but it is up to us to help protect them.

Coral is a living creature related to the sea anemone and isn’t just pretty to look at when you’re snorkeling. According to the Smithsonian Institution, corals are crucial, irreplaceable homes for up to a quarter of all ocean species. The Smithsonian says they’re also valuable to people, providing food, shoreline protection, tourism jobs and even medicines, which make them worth $30 billion to more than $170 billion a year.

According to the Environmental Working Group, An estimated 25 to 60 million bottles worth of sunscreen chemicals wash off into coral reef areas each year. About 25 percent of sunscreen applied to the skin is released into the water within 20 minutes of submersion. We know how important it is to keep the sun protection on our bodies for those of us who need to keep our skin protected while in the water.

When we shower, the chemicals found in certain sunscreens wash off our skin and can pollute wastewater that ends up in the ocean as well. This is problematic because Researchers at Haereticus Environmental Laboratory in Virginia and Marche Polytechnic University in Italy found that exposure to oxybenzone – a hormone disruptor and allergen in 70 percent of the non-mineral products listed in EWG’s latest Sunscreen Guide – can cause juvenile coral to be fatally trapped in their own skeletons. The Italian study also identified butylparaben, octinoxate and a chemical called 4MBC, all commonly found in sunscreen, as toxic to coral health.

A great way to minimize your impact is by wearing UPF 50+ sun protective clothing and using sunscreen on exposed areas of skin like your face, hands, and feet. Divers Alert Network, the largest scuba diving safety association, says applying lotion to only the neck, face, feet and back of hands can reduce sunscreen loads into the water by 90 percent.

If sunscreen must be used, EWG agrees with the recommendations of the Professional Association of Underwater Instructors and the National Park Service that you should use sunscreens that use zinc oxide or titanium dioxide.Though some sunscreens say they’re “reef safe,” those claims are unregulated and can be deceptive  We have many sunscreens on our website that fit into these recommendations: http://bit.ly/2i7xA7Q

Next time you head out to go scuba diving remember to grab your Coolibar Rash Guard and Swim Tights for full coverage protection and save the sunscreen for the exposed areas of your body. Shop sun protective swimwear here: http://bit.ly/2i7MM4O

Sources:

Read more about this topic from the EWG and The Smithsonian 

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Behind The Design

5 New Items from Spring That You’ll Love

Our new spring collection is here and we couldn’t be more excited to tell you about some of our favorite items.

Lace-Up Rash Guard:

With a detailed lace-up neckline and a slightly fitted design, it might be easy to forget the sun protective benefits this Long Sleeve Swimshirt has to offer. Made from our quick-drying, lightweight, UPF 50+ Aqua Suntect fabric, which is salt water and chlorine resistant, this rash guard mixes guaranteed UPF 50+ sun protective features like thumbholes for the delicate skin on your hands, with sophisticated style for an easy transition from recreational swim to lunch at the bistro. Offering the UV protection you depend on, this sporty rash guard is a versatile swimwear staple you will want to add to your rotation.

Shoulder Lace-Up Dress:

Made of buttery soft material, our Shoulder Lace-Up Dress is a fresh take on one of your favorite styles. With an asymmetrical crew neckline and prominent lace up detail, you will look sharp for any occasion but remain cool enough for the hottest summer day. Perfect as a poolside bathing suit cover up but worthy of a garden party, this smartly casual lace up dress is sun protection that is just what the doctor ordered.

Ruche Cowl Neck:

Sure to become your favorite sun protection piece, you will love this Ruche Cowl Neck for the perfect blend of UV coverage and overall attractiveness. Keep the sun off your back (and neck) in style with the asymmetrical rushing that ties at your right hem and a cowl that becomes a cool loose hood to shield your face in an instant. This sporty cowl neck pullover is easily worn for comfortably soft everyday attire, but designed with non-restrictive French terry fabric and thumbholes for an impromptu bike ride!

Chambray Tunic Top:

Easy to dress up or down, our versatile and flattering the Chambray Tunic Top is a classic piece with our sun protective twist. Smartly tailored with a button placket at the neck, roll-up sleeves with button tabs, and chest pockets with a secure button flap, our women’s chambray shirt provide relaxing comfort with stylish elegance. Perfect for every day and made for travel, this lightweight shirt is velvety soft, forgiving and best of all, machine washable.With UPF sun protective coverage woven right into the fibers, you’ll delight in the effortless sunscreen benefit while you enjoy the outdoors worry-free. Comfortable and lightweight to keep you cool, this easy to style Tencel denim top is soft-washed for a vintage work shirt look and easily layered.

Asymmetrical Brim Hat:

Lean back in your lounge chair with ease and relax in the shade of sun coverage with our Asymmetrical Brim Hat designed for coverage, without compromising your comfort, the graduated brim of these sun shade hats provides a larger brim of full shade coverage in the front, with a smaller brim in back, making it ideal to sit in a beach chair effortlessly. The satin ribbon accent bow at the crown is a subtle nod to classic elegance which lends itself well to the versatility of your style. You’ll be able to read all day while relaxing in your favorite beach chair.

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Behind The Design

Resort 2016: Inspired by Morocco

Wonder often. Wander Always.

This season, we’ve wandered to hot places where sun protection is essential and arrived at our inspiration in Morocco, a coastal country rich in intricate hand-painted tiles, vibrant markets, and brilliant coastal waters. The country’s Mediterranean climate is similar to that of southern California, with lush forests in the northern and central mountain ranges of the country, giving way to drier conditions and inland deserts further south-east. We took inspiration from all parts of the country from the palms of Casablanca to the brilliant blue waters of the Mediterranean.

Sun protection is key when going on an adventure to a far away place. When you wear Coolibar, you know you are protected with UPF 50+ protection that blocks 98% of both UVA and UVB rays. This will keep the sunburn at bay wherever your skin stays covered from our soft and luscious fabric that contains tiny little sun-blocking particles.

When you are out taking in the sites, smells, and feel of the country grab a customer favorite. The famous Oceanside Tunic Dress now comes in an amazing pattern perfect for everyday elegant protection inspired by the title around the markets while wandering around Morocco. Our sun protective styles in patterns modeled after ornate hand-painted tiles in corals and pinks make you feel like you are always on vacation even if you are just exploring your hometown.

After taking in the markets, jump right into the beautiful blue waters. Our best-selling Ruche Swim Shirt with adjustable length on the side and a stand-up mandarin collar is perfect for those searching out the blue. Blue is abundant in this North African country. Local artisans look to the sea and sky for their color palette. We were particularly inspired by the diversity of each local from the spice markets to the dessert. It always came back to taking in the water that we can never get enough of in a very sunny and warm climate.

You won’t ever want to leave once you’ve explored in your new sun protective wardrobe. Take it with you wherever you wander this year!

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Behind The Design

What is Waxed Cotton?

Waxed cotton is cotton with a wax woven into or applied to the cloth. It originated in the sailing industry in England and Scotland and became widely used by many for waterproofing. Early mariners noticed that wet sails were more efficient than dry sails, but due to their weight slowed the ships down. In the 15th century, mariners applied fish oils and grease to their sails. The result was efficient sails in dry weather, lighter sails in wet weather. It has been said that necessity is the mother of invention and in this case, wax cotton has been used ever since.

We chose waxed cotton for the Merino Collection because it is great for cooler weather and is a rugged, natural fabric that will look better with some wear and tear. All our new wax cotton hats feature a 100% cotton canvas with a wax type finish. This non-greasy finish will show marks and wear as part of its authentic heritage, getting better with age.

Each hat is custom crafted with unique performance details like a packable roll-up feature, chin cord, plaid cotton lining, ear flaps, these hats exceed all rigorous testing measures for sun protection and offer a 3 inch or larger brim for coverage. Finished with a wax and oil process, our UPF 50+ wax cotton hat are impervious to rain and snow- and actually look better with wear.

Our women’s Waxed Cotton Kettle Hat is water resistant with a 4-inch brim. This sun hat is loaded with character and ready to deliver UPF 50+ sun protective style. This Wax Cotton Sun Hat is packable, weather resistant and ready accentuates your look. Stylish features like the plaid cotton lined crown and the adjustable fit will ensure this little beauty becomes one of your favorites! The best part is this sun hat will take on the most extreme abuse and look even better with wear.

Touches like a leather crown band and interior sweatband make our Men’s Waxed Cotton Fedora a must have for the season. Not just your ordinary Waxed Cotton Fedora this hat offers the best in travel-friendly features: a roll up design for easy packing, a chin cord with toggle for security, a plaid cotton lined crown and leather crown band trim for on-trend style. The best part is this wax cotton hat is made of 100% cotton and finished with a wax and oil process that makes it impervious to rain and snow.

This men’s hat features a plaid fold down ear flaps for superior coverage. The Wax Cotton Cap made in a traditional baseball style with a 4” bill and side grommets for breathability. Stylishly lined with a plaid cotton crown, this wax cotton baseball cap requires easy care spot cleaning and features comfort ready fold down ear flaps for unexpected weather and versatile style. This hat is made of 100% cotton finished with a wax and oil process that makes them impervious to rain and snow.

This wide brim, Waxed Cotton Boonie Hat delivers ultimate sun protection with a 3-inch brim that provides sun coverage, but not so cumbersome that you cannot move your head about freely. Go ahead and wad it up and jam it in your fishing vest or travel bag, we promise with a little unraveling, this wax cotton Boonie hat will march right back into wearable shape. Stylishly lined with a plaid cotton crown, and comfort features like adjustable drawcord fit, chin cord for security and comfort ready fold down ear flaps make this Boonie cap your new favorite. The best part is this hat is made of 100% cotton and finished with a wax and oil process that makes it impervious to rain and snow.

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