Skin Diaries This is Brave

This is Brave: Brian McKenna

Chal·lenge

“A call to fight, as in a battle, a duel, etc.“

It was the spring of 2014. I remember my doctor escorted me past the examining room, straight back to his office, where he closed the door behind me. I may not be a card-carrying member of Mensa International, but I knew something was up. He opened his laptop and started explaining the results from the biopsy he’d taken from my body three weeks prior. Unfortunately, I read three paragraphs ahead of my doctor, and scanned two words that took my breath away, “malignant melanoma”.

I didn’t hear anything he said after reading that.

Fast forward to February 2017. I was diagnosed with a very rare, infiltrating, aggressive basal cell cancer, whose “fingers” wrapped around the nerves in my face and were headed towards my brain. To make matters worse, it metastasized over my entire body. In addition to the aggressive basal cell cancer, melanoma was found on my back. Cancer had challenged me to a fight.

I accepted the challenge.  I wasn’t going to fight cancer, cancer was going to fight me! Instead of “why me,” I embraced “try me” and braced myself for the fight of a lifetime.

In life, you can be the bug or the windshield. I challenged myself to be the windshield. I also challenged myself to share my cancer journey openly, utilizing my public image as a former radio/tv personality, to help bring awareness to skin cancer prevention. I challenged myself to be a loud voice in St. Louis, Missouri, to raise money for skin cancer research with the hope that one day we find a cure.

After nine surgeries in the last 13 months (including a 9+ hour facial reconstruction), over 400 stitches, radiation, chemo, physical therapy and occupational therapy, I’m here to tell you that I am on the road to recovery.

I challenge all of you to be kind, stay humble, do more than is expected, give more than you take, dream big, make a difference in this world and GET REGULAR SKIN CHECK-UPS! Your Vibe Attracts Your Tribe!

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Skin Diaries This is Brave

This is Brave: Cindy Brodie

My journey began with a very small, brown spot on my nose that looked like an age/sun spot.  My “spot” did not itch or burn and was asymptomatic, other than the fact that it would not go away. As a former sun-worshiper, I was no stranger to these “spots”, but I put off seeing my dermatologist until AFTER a holiday trip to Mexico because I didn’t want a small scar on my nose for the trip.

My biopsy indicated the presence of melanoma, but early stage 1. Within a couple of Weeks, Dr. Jerome Potozkin performed the surgical procedure to ensure all margins were clear. Looking at my face right after the procedure made me feel scared and anxious, and wondering if I would ever look the same. The procedures the doctors were discussing for reconstruction sounded barbaric, and I found myself wondering how such a small spot could cause such major surgical procedures to repair.  But I knew the journey had just begun.

Seven days later, I went under general anesthesia for the 1st of several surgeries. Dr. Jonathan Sykes, my plastic surgeon, utilized cartilage from my ear and a skin graft flap from my forehead to rebuild my nostril.  My “trunk” provided a live feed to help regrow my nose and allow the cartilage to settle into the open space. This “trunk” remained on my face for 3 weeks, which was painful and humiliating. I went back to my doctor every 2-3 days to ensure there was no infection and to clean the wounds. I was terrified to leave the house during this time. After the removal of my “trunk” and 9 months of healing, I went back to see Dr. Sykes for another reconstruction.

 

The entire process, from the “sun spot” on my nose to the photo you see here, took one year. I am grateful to Dr. Potozkin for the early detection. It could have been so much worse. I am grateful to my plastic surgeon, Dr. Sykes for reconstructing my face. I am grateful to be sharing my story with you today. If my story motivates you to call your board-certified dermatologist today to make your annual skin exam appointment, then my heart is full.

Cindy has been cancer free for 2 years and continues to have her skin checked every three months, as early detection is key.

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Skin Diaries This is Brave

This is Brave: Beth Allgaier

It takes some time to settle into a melanoma diagnosis.

In early 2016, my father had extensive melanoma surgery, which prompted me to schedule a second full body skin exam within the year.  During my exam, the doctor froze a few “spots”, decided to biopsy a few others, and advised me to keep an eye on a small freckle he discovered on my abdomen.  Something about this “small freckle”, and my dad’s diagnosis, alerted me to do more than keep an eye on it.  I urged my doctor to do a biopsy of this “small freckle”.

One week later, I received the call and it was Stage 1A melanoma.  We caught it early.  With the news of my diagnosis, I was instantly overcome with emotion.  I felt totally out-of-control and paralyzed with fear of the known and the unknown.   Thoughts whirled in my head, “I know melanoma is dangerous, and yet, I don’t know how bad mine is? Will it keep coming back?  Will it become something I cannot stop?  Can I still be outside when it’s sunny?” Anxiety and fear suddenly controlled my life.

I learned everything I could about skin cancer and melanoma for comfort and my own peace of mind.  It was my way of controlling a path I had not chosen.  Educating myself with information and accepting the care and advice of skilled and experienced healthcare professionals, like Dr. Atkins at Georgetown University Lombardi Cancer Center, empowered me.  I felt armed and ready to embrace my diagnosis.

Melanoma is not a choice, but living with a positive attitude is.  I parlayed my diagnosis into a career with the Melanoma Research Foundation, where I am passionate about the work we do and as a patient, I know first-hand the difference this organization makes.  In addition, every morning I journal the 3 things I am grateful for and the 3 things that will make my day great. It’s amazing how much this simple routine launches my day in a good direction and reinforces my mind set on gratitude.

I will continue to research melanoma, but it will never consume me or compromise my positivity. I will always rely on the best specialists available to support my treatment and continue to be proactive with my frequent skin exams and sun protection practices.  Being positive makes me who I am, not melanoma.

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Live Wisely

My 2 Reasons for Covering Up In the Sun: Perspectives of a Muslim Dermatologist-in-Training

As a Muslim-American female, I am no stranger to being covered in the sun. In accordance with my faith, I wear the hijab. Wearing the hijab does not only involve covering my hair. I also cover my skin—except for my hands, feet and face.

As an all-American girl, I was born and raised on American fashion trends. I have always seen the fabric I wrap around my head as just another accessory piece to complete my outfit of the day. My struggle truly began with Michigan summers on the lake. In accordance with my faith, I couldn’t wear a revealing bathing suit into the water. I shied away from participating in water activities because I often felt embarrassed to jump in—fully covered.

Flash-forward to just a few years ago, when my husband and I were planning a vacation to escape the stresses of my medical school training. I was yearning for some warmth and sunshine but felt anxious about finding modest swimwear that wouldn’t make me a spectacle to strangers on the beach. My online search led me to Coolibar. Finally, I discovered fashionable, modest clothing with the primary purpose of UV sun protection in both fabric and design.

Following graduation from medical school, I began my residency training in dermatology and became extremely passionate about sun protection. To this day, the first skin cancer excisional surgery I performed is very fresh in my memory. The surge of excitement from my role in the treatment was shadowed by the heavy burden of making sure I correctly conveyed the importance of sun protection to prevent future skin cancers.

As a dermatology resident, I’ve come across patients of all ages, ethnicities and walks of life who have skin cancer. Regardless of their background, every single patient is regretful about their time spent unprotected in the sun.

Through personal and medical reasons, I’ve taken Coolibar to heart. Not only because styles offer more skin coverage for sun safety, but their UPF 50+ sun protection is guaranteed for life. I never have to worry about my patients or myself when it comes to exposure to harmful UV rays. I love my Coolibar gear because it provides me modest, stylish and, most importantly, SAFE clothing to wear while outdoors!

Dr. Fatima Fahs gives her reasoning behind why she chooses to cover up in the sun. Dr. Fahs is a dermatology resident in Detroit, Michigan. She enjoys blogging about skin care, mom life and residency on her Instagram page, @dermy_doctor

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Live Wisely

8 Must-Haves in Your Car on a Sunny Day

Whether it’s driving to work, soccer practice or to the in-laws, U.S. drivers average 17,600 minutes in their car each year, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. That’s 293 hours! What’s more, passengers spend a significant portion alongside their driving companions. So, review our checklist to see how well your car is packed for your daily commute or the road trip ahead:

 

  1. Sunscreen

While the windshield may block some UV rays, door windows offer limited protection. As a result, most skin cancers occur on the left side of the face and body, the driver’s side. Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen (UVA and UVB) before getting into the driver’s seat. Experts recommend water-resistant SPF 30+ protection. For the safest protection, mineral-based sunscreens with Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide (or a combination of the two) offer natural sun blockers.

  1. Sunglasses

Think of sunglasses as your sunscreen for the eyes. Keep a spare pair in the car for yourself and passengers. Sunlight makes you squint, and that movement contributes to skin wrinkling, but, more importantly, eyes daily exposure to UV rays causes macular degeneration and cataracts. And, the latest news from The Skin Cancer Foundation indicates 5-10% of all skin cancers are eyelid cancers, and the Melanoma Research Foundation points to cases of ocular melanoma. To protect vision health, doctors recommend sunglasses with 100% UV protection.

  1. Umbrella

Whether for rain or shine, a compact travel UV umbrella can be a live saver. Small enough to put in a seat back pocket or a glove box, these little pop-up protectors can help you face whatever Mother Nature has up her sleeve.

  1. Long Sleeves

With those assertive UVA rays coming through car windows, always leave a long sleeve UPF 50+ hoodie or wrap in the car to cover arms. If this isn’t suitable for your everyday life, consider easy alternatives like UPF 50+ sun sleeves or sun gloves that are convenient and quickly removable hand and arm coverage whenever you get behind the wheel.

“Wearing long sleeve clothing, or sunscreen that is ‘broad spectrum’ would be extremely effective and seems indicated on long drives on sunny days.”

-Dr. Paul Nghiem, Head of University of Washington Dermatology

  1. Hat

Have a hat at-the-ready for when you reach your destination. Essential to sun safe practices for protecting your scalp, experts recommend a 3” brim or larger. For every inch of brim, you reduce your lifetime risk of skin cancer by 10%. So, a 6″ brim means a 60% risk reduction.

  1. Phone Charger

In the spirit of automotive preparedness, a phone charger can be a new best friend. In case you need to make a roadside emergency call or even to alert the dog sitter that you’re running late, ensuring you have a full battery on-the-go is essential today. If you have teens driving, insist on a charger so they can update you on whereabouts.

  1. Snacks & Water

Having snacks and water on hand to console kids or boost your own energy makes good sense. Staples that hold up in the car, particularly in extreme temperatures, include granola bars, nuts, trail mix and jerky. If possible, keep a small travel-size cooler or tote in the back to stash snacks and a supply of bottled water. Then mark your calendar to replenish your stores every couple of weeks.

  1. Blankets

Light blankets are multi-purpose pieces with incredible versatility.  Given how UV rays penetrate car windows, a lap blanket can protect upper leg skin while driving. Additionally, on chilly days, it can warm you or your passengers – and it can also block radiant heat coming through windows and overheating skin. People living in snow belt states know to carry a heavy blanket in the trunk for wintery days, and a lightweight UPF 50+ sun blanket for year-round leg coverage when wearing dresses, skirts or shorts.

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Experts Say Live Wisely

10 Ways to Prevent Against Sun Damage

Between soccer games, outdoor concerts, travel and everyday moments, we are experiencing life outside more than ever. So, how can we develop a healthy relationship with the sun and stay safe? Experts recommend you start with these top 10 steps for protecting your family and preventing sun damage:

  1. ALWAYS WEAR THE RIGHT CLOTHES WHEN OUTDOORS

The average t-shirt provides a UPF of 5–7 and that number drops down to UPF 3 when wet. Coolibar sun protective clothing is UPF 50+, wet or dry.

  1. DON’T FORGET TO PROTECT YOUR HAIR

The sun’s UV rays erode the outer layer of your hair. This breaks down melanin and makes hair dry, coarse, wiry, brittle and breakable. Wear a UPF 50+ hat, always.

  1. WEAR A WIDE-BRIMMED HAT WHENEVER POSSIBLE

Start at the top and protect your scalp. For every inch of brim you wear, you reduce your lifetime risk of skin cancer by 10%. So a 6″ brim means a 60% risk reduction.

  1. PROTECT YOURSELF ON OVERCAST DAYS

The sun’s UVA rays are omnipresent at the same strength year-round. Up to 80% of the sun’s damaging UV radiation penetrates clouds and fog.

  1. WEAR SPF 30 SUNSCREEN OR GLOVES ON HANDS

The skin on the back of the hand is thinner and often forgotten. Prevent skin damage and aging on this sun-prone area.

  1. STORE A LONG SLEEVE COVER-UP IN THE CAR

Sun-related aging, spots and wrinkling occur right in the seat of your car. UV rays penetrate windows, so wear a UPF 50+ hoodie/pullover with long sleeves for daily driving and road trips.

  1. MAKE UPF 50+ YOUR BEST ANTI-AGING WEAPON

About 90% of visible skin changes—aging, wrinkles, brown spots and leathery skin—are caused by the sun’s UV rays and can be minimized with Coolibar clothing.

  1. BLOCK UVA/UVB RAYS WITH GUARANTEED PROTECTION

Millions of sun-blocking minerals are infused at the fiber or fabric level and are guaranteed UPF 50+ to never wash or wear out for the life of Coolibar garments.

  1. WEAR UV-BLOCKING SUNGLASSES

Eyesight is vulnerable to harm from UV rays. Prevent corneal sunburns, melanomas and aging vision with sunglass lenses large enough to cover the skin around your eyes.

  1. TRUST COOLIBAR FOR QUALITY UPF 50+ PROTECTION

Clothing is your first line of defense and single most effective form of protection against the sun’s harmful UV rays.

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Sun Tips (Attachment)

 

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Experts Say

Do You Still Need Sunscreen if Your Makeup Contains SPF?

The simple answer is yes. Experts agree cosmetics with SPF are not enough to block Mother Nature’s damaging rays.

“You need seven times the normal amount of foundation and 14 times the normal amount of powder to get the sun protection factor on the label.”

Leslie Baumann, MD

While cosmetic companies have made strides to include SPF in “anti-aging” or “UV protective” formulas, the reality is most aren’t formulated with enough sunscreen properties to provide adequate coverage. According to The Skin Cancer Foundation, that level of coverage only comes from a base layer of SPF 30+ sunscreen first.

How to apply sunscreen to your morning makeup routine:

  1. For best results, apply a broad-spectrum SPF 30+ directly to skin after your morning cleansing routine. Wait a few minutes for skin cells to respond to the sunscreen.
  2. Next, apply serum, moisturizer, primer or your foundation.
  3. If you use a mineral-based sunscreen, this may be applied after your serum and your moisturizer.
  4. Apply sunscreen to the remainder of your exposed skin, neck, upper chest, arms and hands. These areas are often left exposed to UV rays daily.

 

Several new sunscreen formulas soothe, protect and offer properties that nourish and hydrate skin. Brands like MD Solar Sciences Daily Anti-Aging Moisturizer, Paula’s Choice Resist Wrinkle Defense SPF 30 and CoTZ Face Natural Tint SPF 40 provide a great base for your morning makeup and skin protection routine.

For sensitive skin, mineral-based sunscreens with the active ingredients zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide soothe and are non-irritating. In fact, zinc oxide has healing properties for acne and rashes. Don’t worry about the ghostly white-film appearance that zinc oxide used to create, today’s formulas have solved this old problem, and colorless as well as lightly skin-tinted options are readily available.

As we become increasingly aware of the damage caused by omnipresent and invisible UVA rays (think “A” for aging) – premature aging, sagging skin, wrinkling and brown spots – proactive prevention is the mantra prescribed by medical experts. And because UVA rays are also a known contributor to skin cancer, medical professionals and The Skin Cancer Foundation recommend these two primary methods for protection: UPF 50+ clothing and SPF 30+ sunscreen.

 

Sources: The Skin Cancer Foundation, Web MD, Dr. Axe

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Behind The Design SunAWARE

Skin Care Tips All Golfers Must Hear

Wearing Coolibar, Jordan Cassel, golf pro at Torrey Pines Golf Course, site of the 2008 and future 2021 U.S. Open Championship, La Jolla, CA.

Wearing Coolibar, Jordan Cassel, golf pro at Torrey Pines Golf Course, site of the 2008 and future 2021 U.S. Open Championship, La Jolla, CA.

With Saturday’s tee-time on the horizon, you may be more than ready to hit the links, but are you ready to beat the UV rays? Today, playing golf without sun protection is like playing a round without golf shoes. It is a necessity to the game. Sunburn not only damages skin cells, it overheats skin, creating discomfort and distraction. In fact, between stretching, practicing and playing an actual round, a golfer can experience at anywhere from four to seven hours of UV exposure in a day. To make matters worse, for every hour of play, recreational golfers can receive up to 5 times the amount of UV radiation exposure needed to cause sunburn. Along with damaging direct UVA and UVB rays, water hazards and sand traps reflect UV rays back at golfers, nearly doubling exposure. According to The Skin Cancer Foundation, incidence of melanoma diagnosis is in white men over 50, and this demographic corresponds to golf demographics. So how do you start to take sun protection as seriously as you take the game? Here’s how:

Don’t Forget Broad Spectrum SPF 30+ Sunscreen

While this sounds obvious, studies prove no one applies enough sunscreen. And no one every reapplies as frequently as they should. So, a generous measure of 2 ounces should do it. Carry a travel size in your golf bag. For best results, a strong guideline would be to reapply every nine holes or about every two hours for maximum results. Another important factor is the kind of sunscreen you are applying. Use only a broad spectrum (UVA and UVB) sunscreen that offers SPF 30+ protection and is water resistant. For the safest protection, look for a mineral based sunscreen with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide (or a combination of the two).

Take Advantage of Twilight Deals

Avoiding long periods of direct sun exposure is crucial to your skin. In fact, ultraviolet rays are strongest from 10 am to 4 pm, a tricky decision given that’s primetime for golfing. A preventative solution that benefits both skin and your wallet—twilight deals. Many courses offer discounted rates on later tee-times, so save a few bucks, evade UV rays and still get your golf fix.

Don’t Forget SPF Lip Balm

Treat your lips with just as much care as you do any other exposed part of your body. Lips do not have protective melanin like skin. Melanin is the skin’s defense against UV rays. As a result, golfers can experience sunburned lips and this becomes a targeted area for skin cancer. Carry a lip balm with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. You’ll be grateful for this little tube in the future. For the safest protection, look for a mineral based lip balm with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide (or a combination of the two)

Dress for the Round

Don’t depend entirely on sunscreen. In fact, the true first line of defense is long sleeves and long pants. There’s no ifs, ands, or buts – dress to protect. Don’t settle for basic attire, because not all clothing is created equally. Instead UPF 50+ clothing and accessories effectively counter the sun and prevent sunburn. This instantly triggers your skin to feel hotter and sensitive. Coolibar UPF 50+ long sleeve golf apparel, neck gaiters and hats offer UV protection and other performance features like moisture-wicking, Cooltect™ cooling technology and anti-microbial properties, so sunburn and overheating don’t distract you from your game. Look for hats to keep you cool from the top down. The adjustable Matchplay Golf Hat cools with ventilation features and an interior sweatband. Wherever sun protective clothing covers your skin, you do not need to apply sunscreen. To learn more about all our suggested apparel for your next round, visit our new Men’s Golf Collection.

Like golf, skin care is ultimately measured by consistency. Whether it’s lowering your golf handicap or reducing your skin cancer risk, persistence, practice, and, in the case of skin health, prevention –  is required to improve.

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Experts Say Parenting

A Pediatric Dermatologist’s “How To” Protect Young Skin

Remembering to schedule your own full body skin exam is one thing, but what about annual skin check exams for the children in your life? We caught up with Ingrid Polcari, a Pediatric Dermatologist and Assistant Professor at the Department of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota, to find out best practices for children.

At what age should a child have their first skin check and what should a parent or caregiver look for?

Parents should get to know their child’s skin and examine it regularly. Changes in marks on the skin are often the first sign of a problem or concern. It can be normal to be born with moles, or brown birthmarks. Moles can also be acquired over time.

Moles might grow slowly with the growth of your child, but changes like a rapid increase in size, a new shape or changing colors should be brought to the attention of a skin professional for an exam. A board-certified dermatologist, and if possible, one with expertise in Pediatric Dermatology, can help decide which marks are healthy and which need removal.

Are there skin areas where parents should be checking more frequently?

I always tell my patients that I need to check all the skin that they brought with them that day! Then I explain that moles and other skin growths can happen anywhere there is skin, which is why everything needs to be checked. Parents might find that bath time is an easy time to check hidden areas like the skin in the groin, underarms and scalp.

What happens if the doctor notices something suspicious on your child?

First, it’s important to know that skin cancers are extremely rare in children. But, we take changing skin growths seriously.  If we have a concern about the safety of a growth or aren’t able to give a medical diagnosis just by looking, we may opt to either monitor closely (with measurements and photographs for example), or recommend something called a skin biopsy. A skin biopsy is a procedure where the skin is numbed with medication and a small sample of the skin is taken so it can be looked at under a microscope by a pathologist with special training in skin conditions.

Is there a pediatric demographic that may be more prone to skin cancer?

Because skin cancers develop slowly, often after years of cumulative suntans and sunburns, it’s much more common to develop skin cancer in adulthood. Children with red-hair have the highest risk of sun damage when compared with children who do not have red hair. This is because the way they make pigment in the skin is different than in children who have darker hair, so they have less “natural defense” against the sun. This also explains why children with red-hair aren’t able to tan, and instead burn or freckle. These kids need extra special attention when it comes to sun protection!

Do you have an opinion on sunscreen application for babies under 6 months or age?

I follow the recommendations of the American Academy of Dermatology and American Academy of Pediatrics, which says that avoiding the sun by seeking shade or using protective clothing or blankets is the best choice for infants less than 6 months. But if this is not possible and skin is exposed to the sun, apply a small amount of “physical blocker” type sunscreen–these are sunscreens with active ingredients of zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. And remember that infants overheat easily, so it’s best to minimize exposure to heat and sun for your little ones!

Suggestive planning for next family vacation?

Sun protective clothing tends to be more reliable, less messy and less hassle than sunscreen. Outdoor swimming, especially mid-day when the sun is at its highest intensity, is a very high-risk activity when it comes to sunburn. Sunscreen will wash off quickly while you’re in the water, which means it needs to be reapplied often. UPF 50+ swimwear does a much better job in that situation.

Must haves in your family vacation beach bag?

Since I have 3 kids, we fill a whole wagon! A sun umbrellahats, swim shirts, sunscreen, snacks, and some cozy beach cover-ups are vacation musts.

If your child does get a sunburn what should you do? 

First, take note and consider what you can do next time to make sure it doesn’t happen again! Sunburns aren’t just painful, they are dangerous and cumulative sunburns over time will increase your child’s risk of skin cancer later in life.

Keep the skin hydrated with a bland white cream, consider taking a cool bath and consider giving a proper dosage of ibuprofen or similar pain reliever as directed in the product guide. Have your child avoid the sun until the burn has fully healed.

Dr. Ingrid Polcari is a board-certified pediatric dermatologist and mother of three active little girls. In her free time, she and her family love to escape the city and enjoy the outdoors and sounds of the Loons in Northern Minnesota.

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Experts Say

Are You Still at Risk of Skin Cancer During the Winter?

With the warmer weather behind us, it must be time to put away the SPF and your favorite UPF 50+ clothing, right? Not so fast. Your skin needs protection during the entire year (yes, even during the very cold winter months) in order to prevent damage to your skin from UVA and UVB rays that can lead to skin cancer.

You might think that skin cancer will never happen to you because it only happens to people who use tanning beds or get sunburns frequently and badly. Skin cancer happens more often than you would think. All sun exposure poses a risk to your skin even during the winter months. In fact, about 86 percent of melanomas and 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers are associated with exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. In addition, the sun’s UV rays are also responsible for 90 percent of the visible changes commonly attributed to skin aging including wrinkles, leathery skin and brown spots.

People can forget that snow plays a part in how effective UVA and UVB rays are when they hit your skin. Snow reflects up to 80 percent of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. It’s a lot! As a result, the same rays can reach the skin twice. Additionally, up to 80 percent of UV rays burn right through the clouds. Be aware that the sun can still be strong on those cloudy days when the sun reflects off the snow.

Skiers and snowboarders are at an even greater risk, as these sports take place at a higher altitude, where the thinner atmosphere absorbs less UV radiation. Sun exposure increases four to five percent with every 1,000 feet above sea level. Both snow and strong wind can wear away sunscreen and reduce its effectiveness, so you have to take extra precautions.

Treat your skin like you would if you were going to the beach on a bright sunny day. Wear your UPF 50+ clothing, wear sunscreen, re-apply often and protect your eyes.

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