Educate Others Events Success Stories Sun Protection Clothing Wear Sun Protection Wellness Warriors

Monopoly Man: A Survivor Lives On

Jerry Dalton - Cooibar Melanoma Survivor Series

Note: Throughout May, Coolibar highlights melanoma survivors to call awareness to the dangers of melanoma. This week: the terrifying, ongoing journey of Jerry Dalton.

We thought that we wouldn’t get to meet Jerry Dalton, the certified rescue diver. Or Dalton the outdoorsman, the avid fisherman, or the deceptively tough jokester who worked for the maximum-security George Beto Unit in the Texas prison system, the guy who “could always handle what was going on.”

But really, we did. We met Jerry Dalton: survivor.

And this tough jokester known as Monopoly Man (so named by prison inmates when his mustache grew back white and bushy like the character on the Parker Brothers game) is still very much alive.

In an early communication about his schedule he informed us that “I will be fishing. Or swimming, depends on my balance that day.” That turned out to be a reference to what can happen when you combine the effects of long-term melanoma treatment with the effects of standing in a small, tippy boat.

Nerve damage prevents Jerry from lifting his left arm above his head; “fortunately, I’m right handed,” he says. “It’s just not so fortunate when you fall.” He also reports that he is numb from his face all the way down into his chest. “So…just another thing. It’s a perfect place to get shot I guess.”

A Harrowing Journey

Dalton’s battle with melanoma began in September 1999, shortly after his doctor had removed a mole from his left ear. Jerry was driving to Laredo, Texas with Mary, a medical technologist who would soon be his wife (and who plays no small part in this story; she is still by his side today). “I hit my ear with my finger,” Jerry says. “And it bled and bled and it wouldn’t stop. My wife suggested I switch doctors.”Jerry and Mary Dalton 1

Day surgery seemed to correct the problem – “you couldn’t even tell (anything had happened) when it healed,” Jerry says – until the biopsy results returned.

“It came back melanoma,” said Dalton.

A doctor in Amarillo did not hesitate to refer Jerry to Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. There was further surgery there. This time, “they had cut from the top of my ear all the way to the bottom of my throat,” Jerry says, “and (they) removed 40 lymph nodes.”

The cancer appeared in three.

“I was scared,” Jerry says. “But I didn’t really understand it at that time.”

Then came the first of what would be 10 years of PET (positron emission tomography) scans, which create images to show the possible spread of cancer cells –  “At that point it was like ‘why aren’t I glowing now?’” says Jerry – and one year of grueling interferon treatments.

He remembers places, and events. His first transient ischemic attack (TIA, or mini-stroke. A second, more severe TIA in Amarillo, and the doctors recommending he stop the treatments (“I REFUSED!” Jerry says). The day, during his first three-month PET scan, that doctors discovered an aortic aneurysm.

“I thought: oh, brother,” says Jerry. “I beat cancer, and now I’m gonna die of an aneurysm.” Open heart surgery in 2011, during which he received a mechanical heart valve “and a warranty card to boot.”

There were years of moving around and dealing with dwindling finances. Jerry went on disability in 2007; the couple lived in Clinton, Missouri and Palestine, Texas. Jerry and Mary bought several rental properties, selling all but two before the housing crunch. Mary moved to Lufkin and lived in a travel trailer for a while before they purchased their current home there (which “needs help…more than I do,” Jerry says).

This is an important part of the story: during this long period, Jerry was often stuck indoors. Sometimes, due to either the medical event or the treatment, he was unable to eat or talk. The outdoorsman was now wondering about the most basic activities.

“Who’s gonna mow the lawn?” Jerry remembers asking himself. “If I couldn’t do that, I’d have gone nuts.”

Surviving – and Living, Too

This is Jerry Dalton today: he speaks in a husky tone (one vocal cord is paralyzed). His vision is impaired from the strokes. He has a mechanicalJerry Dalton 2 heart valve. He used to weigh 240 pounds; now it’s more like 175. He’s accident-prone; the other day a piece of 2×6 lumber “fell out of my hand,” he says. “Now I have half a black eye…even my doctors look forward to seeing new bruises.”

Jerry Dalton is also cancer-free, and has been since 2011. “The best time was when they said, ‘you don’t need any more treatments. You are free to go,’” says Jerry.

What is most amazing is that he tells this story with a lightness of spirit that lets you know you’re speaking with Jerry the melanoma survivor and Jerry the adventurous rescue diver all at once.

“The biggest challenge for me was just doing the things that I want to do,” he says. “I’m still able to drive and do things like that. But it was all so rough on my body that anything strenuous, especially climbing stairs, has gotten crazy. And the hardest part was dealing with all that.”

Talking helps. Jerry has written a book, as yet unpublished, about his experiences. He reaches out to anyone who will listen about the dangers of melanoma and ways he’s discovered to effectively deal with a diagnosis.

For him, that has been a long-term effort to strike a balance. The former highly active life in and around the water must blend into his more recent existence, which for quite a while has included being afraid to step outside.

“I was so worried at the time to go out in the sun…we had to do something,” Jerry says. “After going through all this stuff with melanoma, and me not being able to go outside, I was scared to death. One of our first things was researching (protective) clothing.”

This was several years ago now, but the clothing remains – Jerry is never without a full-featured Coolibar hat, such as the Ultra Sport Hat, and a Coolibar UPF 50+ shirt. But the fear is subsiding. Jerry credits Coolibar clothing with providing a new freedom, the ability to live and play outside again without worrying about the sun’s UV rays and a recurrence of melanoma.

Mary DaltonA word about Mary: “There is no way I could have done all this without her,” Jerry says. In his mind he goes back in time to a car ride in 1999, and the diagnosis that immediately followed, and all that lay ahead.

“I said, “well, I don’t expect you to deal with this; I’ll just go back to my family,’” Jerry says. “And she said, ‘I don’t think so.’”

In late April, Jerry participated in the Sealy Outdoors Big Bass Splash at Sam Rayburn Lake in the couple’s newly purchased (actually it’s 37 years old, and as yet has no sun canopy) bass boat. That was his first venture out into the sun and water in many, many years.

This is Jerry Dalton, true to form: “I fished Friday am, it was so rough & full of boats that made mine look like a baby boat. I fell Thursday evening while trying to sit on the upper seat. This hurt so much, that I did it again Friday. I was out-fished this year. (But) it won’t happen again!”

 

1 Comment
What's Hot

Help Us Tell Hugh Jackman About Sun Protective Clothing!

Hugh Jackman - Sunscreen

At this point we are sure that you’ve seen the news about Hugh Jackman’s second skin cancer scare. On Instagram May 8, Hugh pleaded with his fans: PLEASE! PLEASE! WEAR SUNSCREEN!

We think this is a great message. But we believe that Coolibar sun protective clothing would be a fabulous solution as well! In case he doesn’t know, sun protective clothing is:

 

  • Easy to wear. You don’t have to reapply every two hours!
  • Suitable for water sports. We have several fabrics that are quick-drying and provide four-way stretch for activity in and out of the water.
  • Cool and comfortable. Lightweight, moisture-wicking material keeps you cool even in the hot sun.
  • Great-looking! Need we say more?

We think Mr. Jackman would look pretty good in a Coolibar sun hat, maybe a polo, not to mention an entire wardrobe of Coolibar UPF 50+ clothing. Do you think so, too? Tell him about sun protective clothing on:

Instagram: @TheHughJackman

Twitter: @RealHughJackman

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HughJackman?fref=ts

 

 

No Comments
Educate Others Inside Coolibar Sun Protection Clothing What's Hot

Diagnosed at 25, Building a New Life in the Sun

Renee Burch Coolibar Melanoma Survivor

By Renee Burch

Note: Each May, Coolibar highlights melanoma survivors to call awareness to the dangers of melanoma. Here, Renee tells her story.

I used to think skin cancer was something that happened after decades of excessive tanning (not to young, otherwise healthy 25-year-olds) or to those living in sun-laden states (not in places like the perpetually-rainy Northwest).

Unfortunately, in March of 2013 I was diagnosed with malignant melanoma on my left thigh. And I quickly learned that, like most other young adults, what I thought I knew about the dangers of the sun and skin cancer was way off.

About Melanoma

Unlike other types of cancer, a la pink ribbons and saving the ta-tas, most people know very little about skin cancer. And they seem to know the least about the most deadly type of skin cancer: melanoma. Even more concerning is the fact that melanoma is the second most common cancer in young adults – and the number of yearly diagnoses is increasing, particularly in young women.

Part of what makes melanoma so deadly (and different from other types of skin cancer) is that it can quickly spread, which is why yearly screenings for every person, young and old, are necessary for prevention and early diagnosis.Renee Burch - Coolibar

The Diagnosis

Let me tell you, it has not been easy – my life was turned upside down the day I found out I had malignant melanoma at the age of 25.

I remember being very confused. I was unsure what it really meant. I didn’t realize right away that having melanoma was going to be the basis for rebuilding my routines – from hiking, athletic events and boating, to walking the dog, looking forward to traveling and starting a family. And, it took me a while to figure out how I was going to continue to do all these things while being “safe” in the sun.

For a while I tried to justify why I got the disease and other people I knew who were my age did not. “Back in the day” I always kept a healthy tan (turns out, it wasn’t healthy after all!), but I didn’t burn often, so I figured I was lucky to tan easily, and didn’t worry much about skin damage.

I shelled out extra money for the tanning beds I was told were the best “because they didn’t have the bad UV,” or because artificial tanning was beneficial to increasing vitamin D absorption.

My parents vaguely warned me about the dangers of overexposure to the sun, but never had any type of skin cancer. So, I lived life under the veil of belief that skin cancer wouldn’t affect me. My uncle had Stage IV skin cancer more than 20 years ago. I figured if he had it, removed it and has never had a reoccurrence, that’s how it worked: get skin cancer, get it removed, and move on.

I spent many months feverishly researching online, reading books, talking to other survivors, and testing a myriad of sunscreens (a trial-and-error that often left me covered in a ghostly white sheen). I completely switched my skin products, certain foods and supplements — everything in my daily life was impacted by melanoma in one way or another.

Renee Burch - Coolibar Melanoma Survivor

I found it difficult to decipher how to lead a normal life versus how to lead a normal life with melanoma. I struggled with the fact that the damage I had previously done was irrevocable. Right now, I have a one in 10 risk of developing malignant melanoma again. If I don’t take care of myself I could be a one in five, or a one in three. But the best I’ll be is a one in 10 risk.

And, I could not possibly spend life holed up indoors, or wearing thick and bulky, dark-colored, long-sleeve clothing on sunny summer days.

After months of angst, I realized I had to stop worrying about tomorrow’s challenges, and take charge. I was only 25. I want to travel, I want to have kids one day, and it was unrealistic that this disease was going to stop me from getting outside and enjoying day-to-day activities. I was determined: melanoma would not control my life. I was going to control it.

A New Life in the Sun

Thankfully, after recently celebrating my one-year melanoma free anniversary (a really big accomplishment for me!), I find myself achieving peace of mind with my diagnosis. I am continuously learning how to navigate life in the sun, without hampering my previously active and outdoors lifestyle.

I have vowed never to purposely seek out a tan – whether in the summer sun or in a tanning salon bed – and I am an advocate to my family and friends about practicing “safe sun”. Perhaps most importantly, I seek shade whenever possible and limit my sun exposure, particularly during peak hours between 10 am and 4 pm (even in the winter or on overcast days).Renee Burch - wears Coolibar

Without UPF clothing, I know my path to a healthy balance would have been much more difficult. I have sun protective clothing for nearly every scenario. In fact, I have a special dresser drawer designated specifically to it! I have UPF 50+ baseball caps for hiking and biking, sun hats for summer boating and leisure, beach cover-ups, running leggings, swim skirts, and a variety of other pants and shirts for whatever activities life throws my way.

I am a die-hard loyalist to my favorite brands of sunscreen (and let me tell you, physical sunscreen that isn’t pasty white sure is hard to come by). I seek out the shade, but when life happens and sun exposure is unavoidable, I know I am “safe” because of my go-to sunscreens and sun protective gear.

I continue to advocate and show others by my example the ways in which it is possible to practice safe sun: apply SPF of at least 30 and reapply regularly, and fake a glow that is actually healthy. (Believe me, self-tanners have come a long way since the days of streaky orange hand prints!) I wear my scar with pride. It’s a 3-inch scar on my thigh. People see that and say: “Wow that looks serious, what happened?” I tell them: “It’s from melanoma, and that is serious, but this scar could be worse – it could be on a more delicate area of the body, like the face.” That comes as a shock to most people.

If you do nothing else, see your dermatologist once a year. With my diagnosis, I visit mine every three months. But if you notice any changes in your moles, even freckles, get them checked out immediately!

Melanoma is a lifelong battle. One that is not, nor ever will be, easy. But I am fortunate to have caught mine early, to have supportive family and friends, and to have access to an increasing range of sunscreens and sun protective clothing.

I also feel optimistic that one day skin cancer will be as well-known as other cancers. With the support of Coolibar and other skin cancer advocates, I imagine a world where melanoma 5Ks and fundraisers, mobile mole-checks and UPF clothing are commonplace.

 

Renee Burch is a native of Seattle, Washington, and serves as an example of youth overcoming fear. Renee has created clear messages about melanoma, including the misperceptions about its seriousness, the dangers of indoor tanning and the necessity to reach people while they’re young about ways to prevent it. Renee is a proponent of dressing “cute and sporty,” and considers Coolibar a tried-and-true sole resource. She owns swim leggings, sun hats, half-zip shirts, jackets and sun hats, and more.

No Comments
What's Hot

Last Minute Ideas for Mom!

We know this would never be you. But if someone you know is in a pinch for Mothers Day, consider the gift of sun protection (and so much more) from Coolibar sun protective clothing. Here a few last-minute Mothers Day gift ideas from head to toe:

 

Facesaver Sun Hat: Nothing says “I love you mom” like a sun hat. It keeps her looking young, and looking great too! Buy it Here

 

 

 

Coolibar Convertible Swim Shirt

Convertible Swim Shirt: Excellent for hard-to-shop-for moms: it’s a tankini or a full shirt depending on her mood. It’s also quick-drying, chlorine and saltwater resistant in case of the urge for a quick swim. Buy it Here

 

 

 

 

Coolibar Coastline Cover Up Dress

 

Coastline Cover Up Dress: Terrific for moms who are likely to go near the water. Or to the mall. Or out to dinner. It’s breezy and casual and fun, no matter where. Buy it Here

 

 

 

 

Coolibar Beach Cover Up

 

Beach Cover Up: The ultimate in casual. It packs up light and unpacks with ease, and always maintains a flowing style that’s easy to wear day or evening. Buy it Here

 

 

 

Coolibar Skirted Swim Shorts

 

Skirted Swim Shorts: Fashion meets function. She’ll love the modest yet modern style. Buy it Here

 

 

 

 Cotz Sunscreen - Coolibar

Cotz Natural Skin Tone Sunscreen: Chemical-free with no complicated oils or fragrances, plus powerful SPF 40 protection!     Buy it Here

 

No Comments
Apply Sunscreen Avoid UV & Seek Shade Educate Others Events Inside Coolibar Sun Protection Clothing SunAWARE Wear Sun Protection

It’s Melanoma Monday. How Much Do You Know?

Coolibar - Knowledge for Melanoma Monday

As it does each year, the American Academy of Dermatology has designated the first Monday in May as Melanoma Monday®. This chance to promote melanoma awareness and prevention is important to us at Coolibar, because we meet people who live with their melanoma diagnoses every day – and because we meet people who are not familiar with melanoma at all.

Knowing about melanoma can save your life – and sharing what you know can save others! Here is a short list of what we’d like people to understand about melanoma.

Melanoma is the Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer.

Some people understand skin cancer treatment as “you find a mole on your skin, you have it removed, that’s it.”

In fact, the majority of melanoma cases involves wide-excision surgery and a lymph node biopsy to determine if the melanoma has spread to other organs. This may be followed by a regimen of immunotherapy, chemotherapy or radiation treatments. In all cases, the possibility of recurrence must be carefully monitored. For melanoma survivors, the letters NED (no evidence of disease) become vitally important for many years.

Melanoma Affects Young People Too.Melanoma affects young people - Coolibar

The AAD says that melanoma is the most common cancer for young adults 25 to 29 years old, and the second most common for adolescents and young adults 15-29 years old.

It’s Easier Than Ever to Prevent Melanoma.

The single best way to prevent melanoma and other skin cancers is to limit exposure to the sun. But some people think that means giving up their favorite activities. Instead, here are a few simple tips to keep you active and healthy:

  • Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen of at least SPF 30, and reapply after swimming or strenuous activity.
  • Wear sunscreen every day – up to 80% of the sun’s ultraviolet rays can reach your skin even when it’s cloudy.
  • Seek shade when necessary.
  • Wear sun protective clothing!

Meet Some Amazing Melanoma Survivors.Coolibar Melanoma Survivors May 2014

Each week during Melanoma/Skin Cancer Awareness Month, we’d like you to meet several very courageous people who can tell you about melanoma much better than we can. Their stories are powerful, personal and inspiring (and, unfortunately, similar to many others from people all over the world). But each one will change the way you think about your health and your life.

We’ll introduce the first of these people on Thursday, May 8.

In the meantime, help us spread the word about melanoma!

No Comments
Educate Others Events SunAWARE

Let’s Help Spread the Word About Melanoma!

Coolibar - Melanoma Awareness Prevention Month

May is officially Melanoma/Skin Cancer Awareness Month, and Coolibar kicks it off with another boost for awareness, detection and prevention of melanoma – the deadliest of skin cancers. Together, melanoma, squamous cell skin cancer and basal cell skin cancer make skin cancer the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in the U.S.

At the same time, according to the Melanoma International Foundation (MIF), efforts to prevent melanoma/skin cancer are the most underfunded of all cancer types. The foundation says melanoma is the least screened cancer, and melanoma detection is not a training requirement for most medical disciplines.Coolibar - Poolside Sun Hat

What Can We Do?

The MIF says:

  • Seek shade and avoid direct sun during the peak hours of 10-4
  • Cover up with protective clothing and use sunscreen lotion
  • Protect your children and role-model sun safe behavior
  • Examine your skin and that of your loved ones each season for any changes that should be checked by a dermatologist
  • Avoid tanning salons: 15 minutes is equal to a whole day’s exposure at the beach!

What Else Can We Do?

Let’s stay aware! Most people don’t realize how a melanoma diagnosis changes someone’s life. Do you?

Coolibar has some special posts ready for you this month. Each week you can meet a melanoma survivor with a story that will amaze you. If you don’t know much about melanoma, these personal stories will help you learn about it quickly. They should also give you a nice dose of motivation. One thing we’re sure of: by the time you finish hearing from these people, you’ll have a different outlook on life.

Key Dates

Our first featured melanoma survivor will be introduced next week, following Melanoma Monday® on May 5. The American Academy of National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention Dont Fry DayDermatology (AAD) has designated the first Monday of each May to raise awareness of melanoma and other types of skin cancer and to encourage early detection through self-exams.

Also, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention declares the Friday before Memorial Day as Don’t Fry Day to encourage sun safety awareness. This year, Don’t Fry Day is on Friday, May 23.

Stay up to date with Coolibar activities on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Another great way to stay aware during Melanoma/Skin Cancer Awareness Month is to sign up for our weekly emails at Coolibar.com. You’ll get links to all of our stories, plus some extra savings on Coolibar merchandise!

No Comments
Coolibar Athletes Sevve Stember

An Athlete Prepares for Summer

By Sevve Stember

As summer approaches, my mind shifts from snow sports (specifically nordic skiing) to climbing, trail running, and biking.

But that’s putting it all too simply. The changing of the seasons is always really meaningful, a natural opportunity to reflect on growth. In my professional, personal, and athletic life, I am always pushing myself to find and see growth within myself. Just as the trees stop growing during the winter as the snow flies, there are also periods where I see less growth than I’d like to. I think this is a fact of life that we all have to deal with.  However, spring brings us a yearly reminder that we are all capable of fantastic and beautiful feats.

I use the desire to always be my better self to fuel my seasonal and annual athletic pursuits. Below are some of the ways I prepare to do so this summer.

Goal Setting

I keep a journal/training log of my daily workouts. This allows me to hold myself accountable for getting outside or working out. The training log also allows me to compare my weekly, monthly, and yearly accomplishments to prior years. In doing so, I can push myself to log more hours on skis, climb harder routes, compare to what I’ve done in the past. It’s a really fun way of tracking my progress towards a goal. In my training log, there’s also a section that I dedicate to setting goals. I often set monthly, seasonal and yearly goals. Goal setting is a super-powerful method of motivating yourself and improving your own personal bests. Once the goals have been set, identify three action steps that will help you make progress towards your goals.

Injury Prevention

I recently went to the world-famous bouldering venue in Bishop, CA.

This was my first trip to Bishop and I was stoked out of my mind! I eagerly threw myself at boulder problem after boulder problem, and unfortunately I did not warm up properly. On the ultra-classic problem “Suspended in Silence”, you start off with an all points off dyno (a climbing move where you jump into the air). On my first attempt, I stuck the move. The next move involves a heel hook while using a crappy left hand hold. Unbeknownst to me, the left hand hold had recently broken, making the problem much harder than advertised. Refusing to believe that I couldn’t complete the problem, I torqued harder and harder on my heel hook. The result was – you guessed it – a loud “pop!” in my hamstring.

In the following days, I had trouble walking and was really sore. Fortunately, I’ve recovered quickly, but it was a good reminder that as summer approaches we must remember that easing back into our spring and summer activities is required to normalize our body/muscles to new stimuli. Take time to stretch, warm up properly, and ease back into your normal workout routines.

Sun Protection

Summer weather literally means more direct sun rays hitting the Earth, and therefore your skin. To account for this seasonal change, I always carry chapstick in my climbing pack. Additionally, being really fair skinned, I always wear a hat Cooilbar Athlete - Climbingoutdoors; it helps keep harmful rays off my skin.  Another strategy that I use is to always wear long sleeve shirts, when temperature dictates. When warmer, I always make sure to at least wear a short sleeve shirt. But I’ve found that the latest UPF 50+ fabrics don’t rely on density for their sun protection and can actually keep you cool even directly in the sun.  It’s just not worth exposing my bare back to the sun, no matter how hot it may be. Lastly, a supply of UVA/UVB sunscreen in my car and climbing pack is an essential that I never leave without.

It is so exciting to be on the threshold of another training, running and climbing season in the Rocky Mountains. I’ve got some big goals for the year:  climb 5.13a, boulder V8 and V9, climb the Red Dihedral in Yosemite National Park, and trail run 20+ miles per week. To reach these goals, it’s going to take discipline, prudence, and using the right gear.

In the coming weeks, I’d encourage everyone to sit down and ask yourself “What do I want from this summer?  What is something I’ve always wanted to accomplish, but not hard the time/energy/etc. for?”  Once you’ve answered these questions, apply some of the strategies outlined above and see your own personal progress becoming a reality. But most of all, just get outside, smile, and have fun!

 

Climber and multiple-sport athlete Sevve StemberSevve Stember is a climbing expert and multiple-sport athlete who has established climbing routes in the Andes, the Sierra Nevadas and several other mountain ranges. A former park ranger, Sevve also pursues camping, soccer and cross country skiing. Sevve is a 6th-grade science teacher at Cole Middle School in Denver, Colorado. He lives there with his wife, Andrea, also an accomplished cross country skier. His previous posts for Coolibar include “Why Climbing Matters.”

 

5 Comments
Events Inside Coolibar

Coolibar is the First Apparel Company to Use BluePel Plastic Packaging

At Coolibar we’re keenly aware how our choices, even in what and how we buy, can affect our water, air and soil. That’s why Coolibar is proud to be the first apparel company to deliver its products in biodegradable plastic (“poly”) bags. To put it simply, we’re making sure the apparel that helps you lead a healthy, sunny life is packaged to help preserve our planet Earth.

Eco-OneTM Technology: Why Do We Use It?

For many, many years, apparel purchases have arrived wrapped in plastic. It lets you know the item has been protected during shipment, and helps you feel good about your purchase. But that plastic is not a natural substance, and it isn’t biodegradable; it ends up in our landfills, where it can stay for hundreds if not thousands of years. Tremendous amounts of plastic and other non-biodegradable materials float in our oceans, too.

But the plastic bag protecting your Coolibar item contains Eco-One, a lab-tested organic additive from BluePel. Eco-One induces the biodegradation of plastics when they reach biologically active landfills. ISO 15985 tests that represent biologically active landfills have been conducted on representative products. Even better, the Eco-One additive itself is 100% organic. It’s comprised of non-toxic raw materials which have even been independently approved for direct contact with food.

So you don’t have to feel guilty about tossing that Coolibar poly bag; the additive breaks it down into organic materials that blend right back into the natural environment.

Our packaging with BluePel Eco-One technology is just one way that Coolibar strives to make your choices in sun protective clothing better and easier.

Because at Coolibar we strive to promote healthy, sunny living. And as Earth Day reminds us, that can only be possible if we maintain a healthy planet Earth.

No Comments
Events Parenting SunAWARE

Pretty for Prom? Tanning Isn’t Part of the Routine Anymore

Pretty Prom - Coolibar

It’s prom season again, which means thousands of teens – girls and boys – flock to their local indoor tanning salons in search of a healthy glow for the big night out. But before they do, the Skin Cancer Foundation has some information for you about tanning for the prom.

Teens tend to be concerned about young-looking skin, and the SCF points out that 90% of changes to the skin that most people associate with aging are caused by exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Tanning leads to wrinkles, spots and an aged look early in life; they can start to appear even before the indoor tanner turns 30.

This doesn’t even touch on the dangers of developing skin cancer, including melanoma. Here are just a few, from SunAWARE:

  • Exposure to tanning beds before the age of 35 increases the risk of melanoma by 75%.
  • More than one million people visit tanning salons every day. Of these, approximately 71% are girls and young women aged 16-29.
  • Young women, under the age of 39, have a higher probability of developing melanoma than any other cancer except breast cancer.
  • Ninety percent of pediatric melanoma cases occur in girls aged 10-19.

What Can You Do Instead?

Through its Go With Your Own GlowTM campaign, the Skin Cancer Foundation promotes skipping the tan altogether – the best look for the prom, or any other time, is your own natural skin color. In case the allure of tan skin is still too great from prom-goers, the foundation also suggests sunless, or UV-free, tanners.

And, if you or someone you know is planning on bronzing up for prom courtesy of an indoor tanning booth, Coolibar has a book for you. Pretty Prom – Your Skin is Pretty Too by Mary Mills Barrow and Maryellen Maguire-Eisen provides a short, convincing account of what’s at stake in exchange for looking tan on prom night.

Coolibar offers Pretty Prom courtesy of SunAWARE. Stay safe, and Stay SunAware!

No Comments
Athlete Profiles Coolibar Athletes

Meet the Coolibar Sponsored Athletes for 2014

Coolibar - Meet the Athletes

Each year, Coolibar proudly sponsors a group of athletes who are uncommonly passionate in pursuit of their chosen sports, and also for personal excellence and healthy outdoor living. Our 2014 Coolibar Sponsored Athletes are some of our finest yet. We’re proud to introduce them today. Stay tuned – you’ll hear much more from and about them throughout 2014!

Stesha Carle

Stesha Carle, 2014 Cooilbar Athlete

Winner of nine international medals, Stesha Carle has participated in rowing races all over the world. Stesha is a native of La Habra, California and rowed for the Long Beach Junior Crew in high school. She was recruited to the University of Michigan, where she earned a degree in Motion Science. Following college she trained with the women’s US National rowing team in Princeton, NJ for six years. Currently Stesha trains in California for SoCal Scullers, with a goal of winning gold at the 2016 Olympic Games. Stesha is a project coordinator for Fastech, a rowing machine instructor for Roworx and a personal trainer.  She enjoys running, hiking and exploring sunny California.

Stesha credits rowing with changing her life. Also, her priorities regarding sun protection changed after her father’s surgery to remove melanoma from his cheek – important in a sport that involves being on the water every morning.

Mekia Earle

Mekia Earle - Coolibar Athlete 2014

Born and raised in Honolulu, Mekia Earle has always maintained a love of the outdoors and fitness, as well as a high standard as a healthy role model to the younger generation growing up in Hawaii. She began playing beach volleyball at a young age, and attended college on an athletic scholarship in the Pacific Northwest. Fitness plays a major role in Mekia’s life. She holds a masters degree in Kinesiology and teaches girls physical education for grades 5 – 8 at Punahou School on Oahu; she also coaches and does color commentary for high school volleyball programs and works out every day to stay fit.

Mekia says that almost everyone who grew up in Hawaii has been affected by skin cancer directly or indirectly. As a wife (her husband recently had skin cancer removed from his neck) and a mother of two children, she is committed to imparting knowledge, awareness and understanding about healthy lifestyles and being smart about the sun.

 Jim Webster

Jim Webster, Long Range Rifle Marksman, Coolibar Athlete 2014

Jim Webster grew up in the Catskills of central New York, where the surroundings and his dad instilled in him a great love and respect for the outdoors. During many fishing outings he learned how to read the water, to spot changes in the environment and most of all what it means to be a conservationist. These skills translated into the patience, observation and practice required to become a marksman, as well as the respect for equipment and the responsibility to firearms safety. He says his dad’s insistence on reviewing the range rules lessened his youthful curiosity about firearms and at the same time broadened his respect for them. Since 2011 Jim has specialized in long range shooting competitions. He has won seven gold medals in 2012 and 14 more in 2013. He is the 2013 NY State F-T/R Long Range champion, and plans to compete in the US Nationals in Arizona in fall 2014. In the near future Jim hopes to open his own marksmanship academy for students of any experience or shooting discipline, with a consistent focus on safety and responsibility.

Jim lives in New York state with his wife Molly and daughter Katie (both very goodmarkswomen in their own right) and enjoys hiking, escaping to the beach and fishing with friends in Rhode Island…all good tests for Coolibar’s complete line of UV protective clothing.

Valerie Stewart

Valerie Stewart - Coolibar 2014 Sponsored Athletes

Valerie grew up a self-described tomboy on a big wheat farm in Washington State. She waterskiied on the Snake River, rode horses bareback, and found plenty of potentially dangerous fun. However, Valerie found no outlet for formal sports until she was 40 years old, with an eight-month-old baby, and began snowboarding.  Soon hopelessly addicted, Valerie competed in the Lake Tahoe division of USASA (United States of America Snowboard  Association) and medaled at every competition; she went on to compete and medal at the national level for the next six seasons.Valerie is the owner of Pow Productions, a video production company that has produced two international snowboarding videos, “Hips That Rip” and “Outlaws to Olympians;” the latter received an award at the 20th Annual Telly Awards.

Valerie belongs to several groups that kayak the rivers, lakes, and bays of northern California. She also enjoys yoga. She says, “When I’m physically active, I feel free, happy, strong, capable, confident, and young.”

Trey Seibold

Trey Seibold, Tennis - Cooilbar Athlete 2014

Born and raised in Florida, Trey Seibold picked up a tennis racquet during college and has never looked back; he has been a professional tennis instructor for the past 25 years.

In addition, Trey participates in triathlons and races surf skis. He’s placed in every race that he competed in this year. His goal is to constantly improve in every aspect of his personal and professional life.

Trey lives in Fort Lauderdale with his wife and three stepchildren. Trey works and trains outdoors seven days a week, so sun protection extremely important. Six months ago he discovered Coolibar and has been wearing it ever since. Coolibar is not only protecting him from the sun, keeps him cool and feeling comfortable since he wears it up to 11 hours! Trey wants to share the importance of sun protection to everyone he works with.

Jerry Leonard

Jerry Leonard, Coach, Coolibar Athlete 2014

Jerry Leonard is a three-time Louisiana state power lifting champion and the athletic director at Salmen High School – his alma mater – where he has been a high school football coach, biology and physiology & anatomy teacher for over 20 years.

He grew up in south Louisiana and spent a great deal of time outside, playing sports and enjoying the outdoors. Jerry is an avid golfer and fitness enthusiast. When he is not outside for work-related activities, he’s usually outside enjoying recreation with his family.

Jerry says Coolibar is a great partner for him to enjoy his time in the sun and protect himself from sun damage. Jerry says, “I like the idea of being able to wear cool and comfortable clothing in the Louisiana heat while being fully protected. Coolibar has given me the ability to enjoy my time outside, do my job, and limit my exposure to the harmful effects of the sun…much to the approval of my dermatologist.”

Leslie Jackson

Leslie Jackson, SUP, Coolibar Athlete 2014

Growing up in SoCal, Leslie Jackson always thought of the beach as her “happy place.” Today, it’s her gym. A not-so-typical mother of two in Carlsbad, California, Leslie began standup paddleboarding (SUP) in early 2013 and quickly graduated to SUP racing. She has a passion for fitness, the ocean and the outdoors, and incorporates SUP into her other pursuits including interval or cross training and yoga.

Her inspiration for activity likely comes from the medical equipment business she owns with her husband, which for many years has served people with disabilities. Recently the business has broadened into custom and adaptive recreational equipment, including the development of an adaptive paddleboard for people with disabilities.

Leslie also shares the joy of sports with her kids, ages 9 and 11 (she’s also an unabashed soccer mom) and trains them in the basics of standup paddleboarding.

Rich Early

Rich Early, softball, Coolibar Athlete 2014

As an eight-year-old in Phoenix, Arizona, Rich Early remembers accomplishing his first athletic goal: getting picked after school to play with the older boys on a real baseball field. Today, he spends winter months in the Pacific Northwest playing indoor tennis and working out in his home gym specifically to stay in shape for the sport he still loves: softball.

By itself this is another impressive accomplishment. A few years ago, Rich developed a sensitivity to UV rays. Sunscreen caused his eyes to itch and water. He was forced to quit playing tournament ball for several years. Coolibar clothing to the rescue – Rich was able to resume the sport this past May.

Rich’s team finished 2nd in the 65 age bracket at the Senior Winter Nationals games in Phoenix last November, as his family watched him play for the first time in more than 50 years. Rich uses his upcoming softball season, which will conclude at the Huntsman Senior Games in St. George, Utah in October, as inspiration as he pushes through his winter workout program.

Kaitlyn Price

Kaitlyn Price, golferA native Floridian, Kaitlyn grew up in the outdoors playing at the beach, soccer field or golf course. Although she played many different sports growing up, she found her true passion was golf. Playing and excelling in countless junior and amateur events gave her the opportunity to play collegiate golf at The University of Central Florida. A recent graduate with a degree in Public Administration and Sports Business Management, Kaitlyn is currently preparing to follow her dream to be a professional golfer.

Kaitlyn has realized the importance of skin protection from her mother who is a two-time melanoma survivor. Along with golfing, Kaitlyn enjoys cycling and boating.

 

No Comments