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SunAWARE

Three More States Ban Tanning Beds for Minors

Because skin cancer rates continue to rise among young adults – a group previously unlikely to be diagnosed – states are acting on convincing evidence that indoor tanning is a significant factor.  In 2013, following a number of other states, Illinois, Nevada, and Texas enacted legislation to block access to indoor tanning for minors. This is a trend we hope will eventually be rolled out across all states.

In June, Texas and Nevada became the fourth and fifth U.S. states to pass laws prohibiting anyone under 18 from indoor tanning; in August, Illinois became the sixth.

These new laws take effect as significant scientific evidence links indoor tanning with melanoma and other skin cancers. According to figures compiled by the Skin Cancer Foundation, of melanoma cases among 18-to-29-year-olds who had tanned indoors, 76 percent were attributable to tanning bed use. And more than 170,000 cases of non-melanoma skin cancer in the U.S. each year are associated with indoor tanning.

Along with the three states to entirely ban indoor tanning among minors in 2013, three others passed legislation regulating the use of indoor tanning equipment. In Oregon, anyone under 18 is prohibited from indoor tanning without a prescription, and in Connecticut and New Jersey indoor tanning is prohibited for anyone under age 17,  This is in addition to other states that require parental consent, or prohibit indoor tanning for those under 14.

The American Academy of Dermatology cites studies showing nearly 28 million Americans – including 2.3 million teens—use indoor tanning beds each year. However, six states have now banned indoor tanning for minors since the beginning of 2012, and some 29 additional states have at least one legislative bill under consideration regarding the regulation or prohibition of indoor tanning for minors in 2014. And the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed that the classification for sunlamps and tanning beds be raised to a Class II level, which institutes stricter regulations to protect public health.

Make your voice heard.

If you believe indoor tanning devices should receive the maximum amount of regulation, which more closely matches the health risks of these harmful devices, write a letter of support to your state elected officials urging the FDA to regulate tanning beds and ban those under 18 from using them. You can also email The Skin Cancer Foundation at advocacy@skincancer.org. The Foundation will compile all emails of support and send them to the FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg’s office.

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Expert Rx

Getting Proactive about Breast Cancer Prevention

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Remembering this famous quote by Benjamin Franklin is a great way to head into October, which is officially National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Except for skin cancers, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, but it can be successfully treated when found early. While this month is dedicated to raising funds for lifesaving research, it’s also furthering awareness so more women (and men) can detect breast cancer early on, and even better, lead a healthy, preventative lifestyle .

Know your risk. Being a woman, the older you get, the more your risk increases. Genetics also play a role as about 5% to 10% of breast cancer cases are thought to be hereditary according to the American Cancer Society. The most common cause of hereditary breast cancer is an inherited mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. You can learn more about your risk by speaking with your family about medical histories along with your physician. Genetic testing is also an option, but should carefully be considered.

Have a professional exam. If you’re at average risk, the Susan G. Komen Foundation urges women to have a professional screening every three years starting at age twenty, and every year starting at age 40. Routine professional exams are crucial in detecting breast cancers in early stages. Talking with your healthcare team will also help determine when you should be seen.

Listen to your body, perform a self-check. While the signs may differ for every woman, if something new appears: lump, swelling, warmth, redness, dimpling, chronic pain or anything out of the ordinary, see your doctor immediately. Get to know what’s normal for you.

Create good habits. Leading a healthy lifestyle is the most natural way to reduce cancer risk. The Mayo Clinic suggests limiting alcohol intake to no more than one drink a day, and refraining from smoking. Also, work to stay within your target weight through a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and exercise. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly, plus strength training at least twice a week.

Avoid or limit exposure to chemical and environmental factors. Avoid exposure to radiation such as medical imaging and environmental pollution like gasoline fumes and vehicle exhaust. Limit sun exposure and avoiding tanning beds, as both can lead to skin cancer. If you’ve had either melanoma, or breast cancer, you’re at increased risk to developing the other according to a study cited by the Skin Cancer Foundation. Check your skin regularly for abnormal moles/spots. Wearing sun protective clothing, hats, sunscreen and sunglasses will also reduce your risk.

Get your pink on, share this message and help raise awareness!

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Events Inside Coolibar

Preventative Medicine and Sun Protection

Coolibar sun protection clothing is excited to attend the Osteopathic Medical Conference & Exposition in Las Vegas, Nevada, September 30 – October 2, 2013. After manufacturing UPF clothing for over 12 years, we’re looking forward to introducing our line of Coolibar sun protective clothing to Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (DOs) for the first time!

Good health stems from good, preventative living – the premise of Osteopathic medicine.  DOs concentrate on treating a person as a whole versus specific symptoms, viewing everything in and outside the body (including skin) as interconnected.

According to the American Osteopathic Association, DOs are the fastest growing and most active segment of healthcare professionals in the US. As complete physicians of medicine, DOs specialize in all the major specialties, including family practice and dermatology. While DOs help treat symptoms, they also teach patients how to prevent illness and injury by maintaining a healthy lifestyle. While there are currently over 52,000 DOs, according to the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, it’s a relatively new practice being first introduced a little over 100 years ago.

Overall healthy living includes protecting skin from the sun’s ultraviolet rays and avoiding tanning beds. UV rays are the number one cause of premature skin aging and skin cancer according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Overexposure to sun may also suppress the immune system, aggravate preexisting conditions and produce side-effects for those taking prescription drugs. Currently, dermatologists recommend sun protective clothing  as the first line of defense against UV rays, followed by sunscreen.

Getting outdoors—where healthy living happens—is a must! That’s why we’re eager to introduce our line of fashionable, active UPF 50+ sunwear to DOs!

Attending OMED? Stop by booth #142 to meet the sun protection experts at Coolibar. We’ll have a special treat waiting for you!

Visit us at the Coolibar booth!
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Wellness Warriors

24 Marathons in 24 Days to End Childhood Cancer

After a medical miracle in his own family, Brian Gruender wanted to raise awareness and funds for pediatric cancer. Brian is a father of four and president of the Snowdrop Foundation, which provides scholarships to college bound pediatric cancer patients, while also raising awareness and funds for the continued research efforts to find a cure to childhood cancer. Despite his busy schedule, Brian was determined to do something for the children. So this summer, Brian completed 24 marathons in 24 consecutive days.

“The number 24 is symbolic because it’s the number of cancer beds at Milwaukee Children’s Hospital and the number of hours we have each day to complete our runs,” said Gruender. This event brought national attention to pediatric cancer.

Brian Gruender holding the American Flag as he heads for the finish line of his last 24-4-24 marathon.

When Coolibar heard about Brian’s mission and the extensive training involved, we decided to help him with sun protection. “I used the short sleeve shirt during my 24 marathons in 24 days event, which included several 90 degree days,” said Gruender.  “It kept me protected from the sun’s harmful rays and gave me peace of mind, allowing me to concentrate purely on running.”

This October, Brian hopes to complete another feat. He, along with three others, will be running 165 miles over four days to raise awareness and funds for the Foundation. Each day they will run to honor a child battling cancer in their home state, Wisconsin. On the fourth day, the runners will arrive at Milwaukee Children’s Hospital to kick off Courage Over Cancer (Fund-urance Run), a 5K run open to the public.

We wish Brian and his team the best of luck this fall! To learn more about the Snowdrop Foundation, visit http://snowdropfoundation.org

To learn more about Coolibar Sun Protection You Wear, visit http://www.coolibar.com

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What's Hot

African Adventure with Cancer Be Glammed Founder Lisa Lurie

Lisa Lurie has a renewed passion for life. After her treatment for Breast Cancer, she co-founded Cancer Be Glammed to provide women with a single resource that provides easy, online access to fashionable yet practical recovery products and style solutions. “In a very short period of time I became bald, breast-less, and bloated from surgery and chemotherapy,” said Lisa. “It was soul destroying.” Now, with no evidence of disease, on top of helping other women find comfort in the face of cancer, Lisa’s making family travel a priority.

I have never been a fan of the term, “bucket list.” When I was diagnosed and treated for breast cancer, I came to like it even less. As I recovered, I decided that I would start a “Here & Now” list instead. A list that would be a celebration of all the things I wanted to do with my family while I was feeling good, in the here and now.

#3 on my list was to travel to South Africa with my husband Brian and our two daughters, Michelle (18) and Gillian (14). Brian grew up in S.A. and we dreamed of visiting his family in Johannesburg, traveling to Cape Town for some seaside fun, and going into the bush on a safari. To celebrate my five year survival anniversary, we decided to leave Pittsburgh behind us and head into the African sunshine to cross item #3 off my list.

Lisa Lurie off to Africa

I have always loved the sun, yet I’ve appreciated the need to protect my skin from its harmful rays. Cancer treatment required that I become even more cautious. Radiation and chemotherapy makes skin ultra-sun sensitive. And now due to my lymph node surgery and resulting lymphedema, it is critical that I don’t burn my right arm. With my husband grumbling about bag weight, (my two teenage girls remember?!) I slipped in my favorite sun protective clothes and hats from Coolibar. As a Co-founder of Cancer Be Glammed, a company that helps women “recover in style,” Coolibar products do what we like best, combine fashion with function.

So now for a little name-dropping. Into my bag went two hats, a Marina Sun Hat and an Adventure Hat. Both hats pack and travel very well. Next I tossed in my Long Sleeve Swim Shirt, a must-have for me. I love having the full coverage without having to worry about slathering on sunscreen constantly. Then finally, I neatly folded my Belted Sun Wrap and put it on top. I live in this—it’s lightweight and stylish, and you can add accessories, such as a scarf, to dress up your look. With my Coolibar wardrobe safely packed, I put on my Travel Shirt, (Coolibar—of course!) and the Lurie family headed to the airport for the twenty- four hour flight to South Africa. Twenty-four hours and twelve amazing days later we returned home. We had a spectacular time and so many amazing experiences that we will be talking our friend’s and families’ ears off for years to come. Together, my family and I contentedly scratched item #3 off the list—our South African trip of a lifetime, and started discussing item #4.

Lisa Lurie
Co-Founder, Cancer Be Glammed

Lisa Lurie in Africa wearing Marina Sun Hat
African Safari
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Avoid UV & Seek Shade SunAWARE

Oregon joins the tanning bed “ban” wagon

On May 9, 2013, lawmakers passed a bill making Oregon the third state, following California and Vermont, to restrict indoor tanning for minors less than 18 years of age. The only exception is if a minor has a doctor’s note allowing him or her to tan for medical purposes.

Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, D-Portland, said the bill was aimed at reducing melanoma, the most lethal form of skin cancer, which studies show is linked to teen tanning. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oregon women have the highest rate of death from melanoma in the country. “At the end of the day this is about protecting Oregon’s children. Something that we’re all committed to do,” Steiner Hayward said to Oregonian. “When 32 percent of high school girls are using tanning beds, parents aren’t doing their job.”

Tanning beds were also highlighted during Skin Cancer Awareness Month this May as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced their support of stronger warning labels on tanning beds, including a recommendation that people under the age of 18 abstain from using the devices. The FDA also hopes to reclassify tanning beds and sunlamps from Class 1 (low risk) to Class 2 (moderate risk) devices.

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Success Stories SunAWARE Wellness Warriors

Melanoma Survivor Tim

During Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Coolibar invites skin cancer survivors to share their stories with us in their own words. Hope, determination and drive to educate others play a major role in these individuals’ lives. Skin cancer doesn’t discriminate, it can happen to anyone. Prevention and early detection can be life saving! We hope you share these stories with your friends, family and colleagues. Be SunAWARE. Read Tim’s story.

Like the day my wife and I were married, and the days our children were born, Thursday, August 18, 2011 will forever be burned into my memory. We were on vacation in Maine. My wife, son and I were leaving to sneak in nine holes of golf before the day was over when I got the call from my doctor. He confirmed that the suspicious looking mole on my arm was melanoma. Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, was on the top of my right forearm. Wow. The prognosis was good, the melanoma was .62mm in depth (generally if the melanoma is thicker than 1mm it is more likely to have spread) and therefore was considered an “early stage” and would require an excision surgery to remove surrounding tissue to check for spreading. I was scheduled for this surgery just five days later and although the surgery showed that all of the melanoma was removed, the pathologist suggested another surgery to obtain the proper margins; 1 cm of clean tissue around the melanoma is required to be removed and be clear of cancerous cells for a pathologist to consider it a clean excision. A month later, I had another excision surgery and this time the margins were met. My doctors determined that with these successful surgeries, no further treatment would be necessary at the time.

The physical healing is progressing well; the mental and emotional healing will take a bit more time. A cancer diagnosis is a very scary. This disease can strike at any time, to anybody without prejudice. It can take your world and turn it upside down. Support of friends and family is critical.

I am currently scheduled for full-skin examinations every three months for the next three years. If I am fortunate enough to not have a re-occurrence of melanoma, then I will move to six month examinations and eventually annual examinations.

My diagnosis not only came as a shock to me, but because melanoma can be hereditary, my family was impacted. They scheduled skin exams since their risk was now elevated. As a result, my older brother recently had a procedure to successfully remove a squamous cell carcinoma, a non-lethal form of skin cancer but alarming just the same. With a new outlook on skin protection for my family and myself, I am very thankful for my early detection and now am focused on keeping us all sun safe. There is an acronym being used now concerning the prevention and detection of skin cancers, SunAWARE. A=avoid unprotected exposure to the sun, W=wear protective clothing and hats, A=apply broad-spectrum sunscreens year-round, R=routinely check for changes in your skin and E=educate yourself and family about sun protection.

I have been working on farms and in the construction industry since I was 13 years old. The days of my youth were as many others, careless and carefree. I was never a lay around in sun kind of person but kind of lived my life with the motto “no shoes, no shirt, no problem”. Always outdoors and rarely protected! Eight years ago, with the passing of my friends father from cancer, a group of friends and I signed up for the Pan Mass Challenge to raise money and awareness for the fight against cancer. This event, which is the most successful cancer fundraiser in the nation, was started by a gentleman named Billy Starr after losing his mother to melanoma back in 1980. It is this event that had brought so much good in my life. It became an annual tradition my whole family took part in. The event was most likely caused the damage to those skin cells on my arm. The top of your forearm is 100% exposed while riding a bike. I am on my bike hundreds of hours a year riding over 2000 miles in preparation and before 2010 was completely unprotected from the sun. I have included a picture with my family form the 2012 ride (pictured above) and for the record; I removed my Coolibar Full Zip Bike Jacket a mile from the finish so I could cross the finish line with my team jersey.

Now, as a 42-year-old father of two and an outdoor enthusiast with activities that take me through all 12 months of the year, the protection of my family and myself has become a daily occurrence. Our leading defense against the suns damaging rays is with UV protective clothing and sun protective lotions for the exposed skin. I am similar to most, once I received my diagnosis I enveloped myself with what melanoma is, every aspect of it’s being and mostly how to prevent a re-occurrence, or in my families case an occurrence! That is how I found Coolibar — my leading defense against re-occurrence. I cannot be found outdoors with out a piece of clothing with that distinct logo on it. My other line of defense is sun protection lotion and I have found another ally in that battle, the Environmental Working Group (EWG). The EWG is the nation’s leading environmental health research and advocacy organization. Their mission is to serve as a watchdog to see that Americans get straight facts, unfiltered and unspun, so we can make healthier choices and enjoy a cleaner environment. I research different products on this site for me and my children, and then can usually find those products on the Coolibar website.

As previously mentioned, my diagnosis has rippled through my family and friends. My brother successfully had squamous cell carcinoma removed and is currently on a yearly check up. My children’s pediatrician is on heightened alert to anything that might be remotely suspicious. Most of my friends have gone to a dermatologist for a skin check and have also increased their protection levels. I am not one to soap box, but when it comes to skin cancer awareness, I will stump all day. So many cancers are not preventable and although melanoma might fall into this category we can all greatly diminish our risk. It is becoming increasingly easier in this country to protect yourself, your friends and loved ones, so why wouldn’t we? Awareness over the last five years has significantly skyrocketed. In 2011 the FDA issued new requirements for over-the-counter sunscreens concerning their labeling with regard to their protection levels, what type of UV protection they offer, the terminology used like “sunblock” and “waterproof”. The ability to be protected is ever-present. My hope is that everyone absorbs as much information as they can and use it to protect themselves and their families.

This year I will be adding another acronym to my list, the ABCDE’s of skin cancer. This acronym is concerning moles on your skin and what to look for: Asymmetry (each of the mole’s halves should be identical. Is the mole flat or raised)
; Border (an irregular border is abnormal)
; Color (dark and/or multiple colors signify a potentially dangerous change)
; Diameter (if the mole is larger than a pencil eraser, it may need evaluation)
; Evolution (a sudden change in the mole can indicate a problem).

Tim

“I’m not a dreamer, and I’m not saying this will initiate any kind of definitive answer or cure to cancer, but I believe in miracles. I have to.” …. Terry Fox, October 1979, in a letter requesting support for his run

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Success Stories SunAWARE Wellness Warriors

Melanoma Survivor Capt. Harry

During Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Coolibar invites skin cancer survivors to share their stories with us in their own words. Hope, determination and drive to educate others play a major role in these individuals’ lives. Skin cancer doesn’t discriminate, it can happen to anyone. Prevention and early detection can be life saving! We hope you share these stories with your friends, family and colleagues. Be SunAWARE this month and all year long. Read Capt. Harry’s story below.

I am fifty years old and run a saltwater charter fishing business out of O’Neill’s Marina in St. Pete, Florida. I had always spent a lot of time on the water, but not like this. In 2005, I started going to the dermatologist two times a year. In March of 2012, the dermatologist told me to keep an eye on a spot in the upper middle of my back, not to worry about it, but just watch it. This spot was in a place that I could barely see, even with two mirrors. I made the mistake of forgetting to tell my wife what the doctor said about keeping an eye on that spot.

While on a vacation in October, my wife noticed that spot on my back and said it did not look right. I went to the dermatologist in early November and the doctor said it was great that my wife noticed the spot. It did not look right to him and a biopsy was done.

I was on a fishing charter just off St. Pete beach when the doctor’s office called and told me that I had a Clark Level 3 Melanoma and to schedule an appointment with Moffitt Cancer Center. I didn’t know what to think. I was scared, angry, nervous and just wanted to get off the boat. As much as I tried not to let my clients know what that phone call was about, I’m sure they noticed a change in my attitude. I was so mad and angry that I told my wife that evening, “I don’t want to tell anyone about this, that it was my business, and it stays between us.”

We were reading everything we could about Melanoma and Clark Level 3 diagnosis. All this information was making the both of us more anxious, nervous, scared, angry and upset. Knowing and keeping this a secret was not the right thing to do. After a week or so, we agreed to tell two of her brothers that live close to us and my dad, and at some point my brother and sister who live in other states.

After Thanksgiving, we met with our team at Moffitt Cancer Center, and they told us what the procedure would be and scheduled the surgery for December 13th. While in a tree stand hunting one morning, I finally came to grips with what was going on and decided it was fine to talk about it, and totally changed my attitude. It took me three weeks to get to that point, but the anger was gone. I was still anxious and nervous, but not mad and angry.

After sitting in that tree for three hours, I got down and took a walk through the woods. I came upon a guy who was spraying invasive plant species to get rid of them. We talked for four hours and while talking he tells me that his wife went through breast cancer and Moffitt Cancer Center helped her beat it. She was cancer free and doing great. After about three hours, I told him I had just come to grips with my diagnosis, and I told him about it. He asked if it was alright with me if I would join him in a prayer for me. I told him it can’t hurt, so we prayed. It really was something that I ran into this man just after coming to grips with my situation.

I went in for the surgery on the 13th, and the first step was to inject a dye around the biopsy area to determine where and if the cancer had gone to any lymph nodes. The dye showed that it had gone to one lymph node in my left armpit and three in my right armpit. The surgery went well and they removed one under my left arm and three under my right. They also removed a large area around the biopsy. They scheduled my follow-up visit for December 31st. It was going to be an anxious two and a half weeks waiting for the lab results. After about ten days, my wife said let’s call and get the lab results. This was an anxious call but a great one. The nurse told me that all the lymph nodes came back negative and all of the area around the biopsy was also negative. Hallelujah! Christmas was so much better.

Words to the wise:

I had never heard of Coolibar before having to research melanoma and UPF clothing. Living and boating in Florida, you are going to be in the sun. I think, like myself, a lot of people have never heard of Coolibar. I spend over 200 days on the water, and clients as well as others in my industry, pay attention to what others are wearing. Regular cotton tee shirts just will not hold up, so people need to see others wearing sun protective apparel. Lead by example.

Capt. Harry

Capt. Harry’s Website: Hook Em Harry

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Avoid UV & Seek Shade

FDA works to increase awareness of tanning bed risks

Tanning Bed

Monday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a proposed order that, if finalized, would reclassify sunlamp products and require labeling to include a recommendation designed to warn young people not to use these devices.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, there is a 75 percent increase in the risk of melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, in those who have been exposed to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning, and the risk increases with each use. The proposed order does not prohibit the use of sunlamp products by those under the age of 18, but it provides a warning on the consequences.

The order would reclassify sunlamp products from a low risk device (class I) to a moderate risk device (class II).

“Using indoor tanning beds can damage your skin and increase your risk of developing skin cancer,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “The FDA’s proposed changes will help address some of the risks associated with sunlamp products and provide consumers with clear and consistent information.”

If the order is finalized, manufacturers would have to submit a pre-market notification (510(k)) to the FDA for these devices, which are currently exempt from any pre-market review. Manufacturers would have to show that their products have met certain performance testing requirements, address certain product design characteristics and provide comprehensive labeling that presents consumers with clear information on the risks of use. The order proposes to include a contraindication against use on people under 18 years old, and the labeling would have to include a warning that frequent users of sunlamp products should be regularly screened for skin cancer.

Resource: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm350864.htm

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Events SunAWARE

Skin Cancer Awareness Month 2013

May has been declared Skin Cancer Awareness Month by the Centers for Disease Control. They remind us to increase awareness of the importance of the prevention, early detection and treatment of skin cancer. Each year, approximately 2 million persons in the United States are diagnosed with non melanoma skin cancers. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a history of sunburn are preventable risk factors. With a little pre-planning it is easy to be sun safe all season long, and we’ve gathered a few ideas to help get you started.

1. Be SunAWARE and Be Safe! Use the easy to remember SunAWARE acronym to help keep in mind all the steps needed for sun safety. Remember it, use it and share it!

2. Get a Free Skin Cancer Screening at the Road to Healthy Skin Tour. The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Road to Healthy Skin Tour will make its way across the U.S. The mobile Tour kicks off in New York City in May for Skin Cancer Awareness Month. Check the Tour Schedule to see if it’s visiting your community.  If you go, say hi to the Tour event managers, Chris and Christie, protected by Coolibar Sunwear.

3. SPOT Orange™ on Melanoma Monday.  The American Academy of Dermatology designates the first Monday in May as Melanoma Monday and asks you to SPOT Orange™ to raise awareness of skin cancer. Visit the Academy’s website to find free screenings in your neighborhood.

Coolibar proudly supports the AAD’s SPOT Orange™ Skin Cancer Initiative and you can too.  We donate $10 for every Coolibar UPF 50+ SPOT™ Tee sold.

Coolibar UPF 50+ SPOT T-Shirt Coolibar UPF 50+ SPOT T-Shirt

 4. Attend a Skin Cancer Prevention Event.  Throughout the country there are walks, runs and golf tournaments that all benefit skin cancer prevention efforts. A few of our favorites are MRF’s Miles for Melanoma, MIF Safe from the Sun and the Stay Out of the Sun Run in MN.

5. Celebrate Don’t Fry Day. The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention declares the Friday before Memorial Day (May 24, 2013) as “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage sun safety awareness. Because no single step can fully protect you and your family from overexposure to UV radiation, follow as many tips as possible.

Do you have other suggestions?  Share how you plan to make May and the rest of your summer sun safe. ‘Leave a reply’ below or visit our Facebook page.

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