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Winter Skin Tips

Keep your skin alive in the dead of winter by following these simple skin care dos and don’ts.

DO Moisturize
Lotions and creams don’t add moisture to your skin, but they help trap in moisture that’s already present. Apply lotion within a few minutes after showering, bathing or washing your hands to effectively lock-in moisture. Look for lotions containing humectants (glycerine, sorbitol and alpha-hydroxy acids) that attract moisture.

Oil-based lotions also work well as oil creates a protective moisture retaining layer on the skin. For the face, use lotions with avocado, mineral, primrose or almond oil as they won’t clog pores, or look for lotions labeled non-comedogenic (won’t clog pores).

If lotions aren’t enough, try creams. The drier your skin, the thicker the skin cream you’ll want to use. For those who dislike the feeling of slippery skin or have sensitive skin, try unscented Vanicream Moisturizing Skin Cream.

DO NOT Take Long Hot Showers
Bathing strips your skin of its natural oils. Hot water in particular breaks down the lipid barriers in the skin, which can account for moisture loss. Reduce shower time and take warm showers, not hot, in order to retain your skin’s natural moisture. Also, try using a moisturizing body wash to further lock in moisture.

DO Use Sun Protection
UV rays from the sun don’t disappear during the winter. In fact, snow, ice and other reflective surfaces often refract UV rays making them more intense. Apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen on your face and any exposed skin 30 minutes before venturing outside.

DO NOT Ignore Hands and Feet
The skin on your hands is thinner than on most parts of the body and has fewer oil glands. That means it’s harder to keep your hands moist, especially in cold, dry weather. Wear gloves when you go outside, but also wear gloves inside when doing common household chores, such as dishes. If your hands are extremely dry, before bed put on moisturizer followed by a pair of cotton gloves to lock-in moisture overnight. Also, avoid wet gloves in order to prevent itchy, cracked, or severe skin conditions such as eczema.

For your feet, use exfoliants to get the dead skin off periodically and help moisturizers sink in faster and deeper.

DO Drink Water – and a lot of it
Water may not have any direct affect on the condition of your skin, but drinking an adequate amount of water (10-12 glasses a day) is good for overall health. The average person’s skin does not reflect the amount of water being drunk, but severe dehydration is not good for dry skin either.

DO NOT Be Afraid to Seek a Specialist
If none of the above skin tips help — get help! Dermatologists in particular can help you troubleshoot your skin problem and recommend skin care products that may work better for you.

Vanicream Moisturizing Skin Cream now at Coolibar

To purchase moisture-locking lotions, creams or broad-spectrum sunscreens, visit http://www.coolibar.com/skin-care.html

Resources:

WebMD – 10 Winter Skin Care Tips

USA TODAY –  Give Dry Skin a Helping Hand this Winter

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Sun Protection Clothing Videos Wear Sun Protection

Sun Protective Clothing (Video)

Dermatologist Dr. Jaime Davis
Uptown Dermatology
Minneapolis, MN

Hi, this is Dr. Davis for Coolibar Sun Protective Clothing.

I wanted to talk to you today specifically about sun protective clothing and why we need it.  While we love our sunscreen and advise putting sunscreen on the face, V of the neck, back of the hands, the best sun protection actually comes from sun protective clothing

The fact is, it’s hard to use enough sunscreen and remember to re-apply it.  But if you put on a nice piece of sun protective clothing, you have the relief of not having to remember to do those things – especially for the kids who are going to be out and about and playing.  Simply putting a t-shirt on them and letting them run around in the water is not enough sun protection.  That t-shirt loses its sun protective factor the minute it gets wet. It goes down from maybe a 5-7 to about a 2 and that’s not enough sun protection for a kid. 

I’m going to show you some interesting alternatives.

Coolibar makes a fantastic material that is UPF 50, nice light woven material, tightly woven so the sun does not get through it.  It’s like  a fine silk really and it’s a synthetic fabric that washes up beautifully, I know, but it feels super lightweight and is  very breathable and is constructed so that there is airflow through the back.  So, you don’t overheat in these, even though you’re wearing long sleeves there is beautiful ventilation.  And actually, keeping the Ultra violet light off your skin keeps you cooler.  Ironically wearing a sun protective shirt will keep you cooler.

Some nice clothing for kids this fabric has Zinc Oxide, a physical sunscreen that we reviewed in another segment, embedded in here.  This keeps you nice and sun protected and even if it gets wet it does not lose its sun protective factor.  And some super cute stuff for kids, this long sleeve, you just don’t have to worry about getting the kids sunburned.  Keep the hat on everybody, a nice pair of sunglasses and you’ve got it covered.

Stay SunAWARE, Wear Sun Protective Clothing and Be Safe!

Coolibar Sun Protective Clothing

 

 

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Avoid UV & Seek Shade SunAWARE

New Year’s Resolution – No Tanning Beds!

People are making their 2011 New Year’s resolutions. For many, forming healthy habits is a high priority, including more physical activity, healthy eating or quitting smoking. This year, consider adding this one to your list – Resolve to Make 2011 the year of No Tanning Beds. By avoiding tanning beds, you decrease your risk for skin cancer, maintain a healthy, younger looking complexion and save money. It’s like four resolutions rolled into one. 

Decrease Your Risk of Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is a global epidemic with 90 percent of all cases caused by sun exposure, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. It is also the most common type of cancer in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimated that 1 million new cases of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer were diagnosed in 2009, and 8,650 deaths were attributed to melanoma. For those who use tanning beds, the risk of forming melanoma increases by 74 percent compared to those who never frequent tanning salons, claims a report in the journal of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. And for those who spend more than 50 hours under those indoor UV rays, the risk triples. Even more troubling, the newer high-pressure tanning beds (that mostly emit UVA rays) can increase the risk to four times.

Maintain a Healthy, Younger Looking Complexion Longer

Ultraviolet radiation may cause irreversible changes in the skin including fine wrinkles, deep grooves, blotchiness, sagging and a leathery texture. Some of these changes may appear as early as the age of 20 in anyone who has spent a great deal of time in the sun during childhood and teen years. Artificial tanning can cause any or all of these unwanted cosmetic effects and contribute to premature aging of the skin.

Save Your Money

The tanning industry generates more than $5 billion in annual revenues each year despite the warning that tanning beds are dangerous, according the American Cancer Society. If you frequent tanning salons, a chunk of that revenue came from you! In addition, with the new 10% tax on tanning beds, artificial tanning is becoming an increasingly expensive habit.

The use of tanning beds can create undesirable long term effects. The benefits of avoiding them can be significant – and it’s never too late to break a bad habit!  Join us in saying “No” to tanning beds. 

Avoiding tanning beds is the first step toward a healthy, SunAWARE New Year!

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SunAWARE

Winter Sun Protection Mythbusters

Ski tracks in snow

This winter, as you head outside for your favorite winter activities or start planning a sunny vacation getaway, keep these common winter sun protection myths in mind. 

Myth #1 – I don’t need sun protection in the winter. 

FALSE. The intensity of UV rays varies with the changing seasons and is strongest during the summer months. However, indirect or reflected rays add to the amount of UV exposure received. These rays “bounce” from surfaces such as snow, sand, water, concrete and buildings and can still cause burns—especially during winter activities like skiing. 

Myth #2 – I need to tan to ensure healthy amounts of Vitamin D. 

FALSE. Tanning is not necessary to achieve vitamin D requirements. Studies show that a few minutes of exposure to the sun, two or three times a week is sufficient. Vitamin D supplements are available and as always, speak to a doctor if you are concerned. 

Myth #3 – Getting a “base tan” before heading out on a sunny winter vacation, will minimize the risk of sunburn or sun damage. 

FALSE. All tans are damage to the skin. What is called a “base” tan would equal an SPF of about 2, which is so low it is counterproductive. You may prevent burning, but you have increased your chances of getting skin cancer. 

Myth #4 – You can’t get sunburn on a cloudy winter day. 

FALSE. Cloud cover reduces UV radiation levels, but not completely. Even on a winter day with full cloud cover, exposed skin can burn. 

Myth #5 – SPF ratings measure sun protective clothing. 

FALSE. UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor) is the correct rating for clothing. UPF is a similar concept to SPF for sunscreens. UPF is the ratio of how much UV radiation passes through a fabric. If a garment isn’t UPF rated, then it isn’t guaranteed sun protection. 

Make a healthy habit of using sunblock, sun protective clothing and sunglasses all year long. Be Safe. Be SunAWARE. 

Family sledding
Family sledding
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Expert Rx SunAWARE Videos

Vitamin D and Sunshine (Video)

Dermatologist Dr. Jaime Davis
Uptown Dermatology
Minneapolis, MN

Hi, this is Dr. Davis for Coolibar Sun Protective Clothing.

I just wanted to touch on the topic of Vitamin D and Sunshine.  And while we all agree that we need adequate amounts of Vitamin D the American Academy of Dermatology holds the position that Ultraviolet light is not the safest way to get your Vitamin D

It’s preferred to do that through dietary intake – fish such as salmon or even tuna, even vitamin D supplementation in a vitamin pill is a lot safer for you than getting it through your skin.   In the old days when it was recommended that we get a little natural sunlight, the thing is there weren’t as good of variety of dietary sources and now there are.

So, vitamin D is something you can get adequately through your diet, still use your sunscreen and remain sun safe and SunAWARE!

Disclaimer: The information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem. 

Fatty fish, such as salmon, are natural sources of vitamin D
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Wellness Warriors

High Altitude Sun Protection

Above the Clouds – Beneath the Sun

We at Coolibar have great admiration for those who pursue intense outdoor adventures and strive to help them do it safely.  Height seeking mountain climbers need to be aware of the dangers of UV at higher altitudes.  According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), “UV intensity increases with altitude because there is less atmosphere to absorb the damaging rays. As a result, the chance of damaging your eyes and skin increases at higher altitude.”

Our friend Paul Ridley of Row for Hope shares his Mountaineering experience.

High altitude mountaineering comes with lots of obvious risks: avalanches, crevasses, falling ice, high winds, and high altitude sickness. As a climber with two parents who’ve battled melanoma, I’m acutely aware of the health risk from sun exposure that is only a second thought to many mountaineers.  

In the thin air climbers encounter above 10,000 feet there is often no hope of protection from clouds, and the thin air and reflective snow makes for dangerous sunburns. While climbing I’ve been sunburned on the roof of my mouth, the underside of my nose, and inside my nostrils.

Paul Ridley – Muir Snowfield

Keep in mind there is enough reflected UV that even in a shaded area, skin can sunburn. Apply sunscreen to exposed areas to avoid a burn, even if you plan on wearing a sun hat or staying in the shade.  The Coolibar Face Shield offers both the skin –coverage protection and breathe-ability that sun-conscious climbers need at altitude.

Take it from Paul and remember to protect your skin, especially at high altitude.

  • Sun protective clothing, including a hat with a three-inch brim, will protect you at all times of the day. 
  • Use ample sunscreen on those parts of your skin that will be exposed – face, neck, top of ears, hands.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes. 

Be SunAWARE and Be Safe!

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Expert Rx Wellness Warriors

Tennis Anyone?

Improve your Game 

On the heels of the US Open, we wanted to call attention to the vast number of hours that tennis players spend in the sun, exposed to harmful UV.  While we understand that sun protection is not your main focus while on the court there are some alarming statistics from the Skin Cancer Foundation that tennis players cannot ignore. 

 

  • One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime.
  • About 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.
  • Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25-29 years old and the second most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults 15-29 years old.

 Jennifer Reinbold, a former pro tennis player who now coaches in Indianapolis spoke to the Skin Cancer Foundation about her experience.  Jennifer competed in nine grand slam tournaments, reaching the Wimbledon quarterfinals in 1983 before losing to the eventual winner, Martina Navratilova.  After years of sun exposure, and some incident with skin cancer, Jennifer practices what she preaches: Respect the sun! 

        “Q: Do you think the message about sun protection is getting through?” 

“A: There is more sun awareness today. Most players I teach or play with wear sunscreen and have a hat in their tennis  bags. However, they don’t usually reapply sunscreen when playing for extended periods. Also, just because they have a hat or visor doesn’t mean they use it! Many players don’t realize their scalps are as vulnerable as the rest of their bodies.” 

Some of the best players on the court have dedicated themselves to promoting skin cancer awareness, including tennis pro Andy Caress.  Before he lost his battle with melanoma last August, at the age of 25, he started the Andy Caress Melanoma Foundation (formerly Mela-KNOW-More) to alert the world of the seriousness of Melanoma Skin Cancer and the dangers of the sun’s harmful rays.  Andy said, “I did not understand that I was threatening my life when I went outside and did not wear sunscreen.  I was 23 and figured I was way too young to worry about cancer.”

The good news is that there are simple SUNAWARE steps you can take to protect yourself from UV, and it’s never too late to start.

So grab your racquet, hat, UV T-shirt and sunscreen and hit the court! Protect yourself from the sun so you can concentrate on your game. 

Point, Set, Match!

 

Andy Caress – Founder Mela-KNOW-More
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