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Dermatologic skin care for your 20s, 30s…60s and beyond

Board-certified dermatologist Dr. Jaime Davis, M.D., F.A.A.D. of Uptown Dermatology in Minneapolis talks dermatologic care for your skin at every age.

Skin cancer is a concern across all ages and is being seen more and more in younger people, especially among those who have ever used tanning beds.

Excessive ultraviolet light exposure, natural or artificial, not only increases skin cancer risk, but also prematurely ages the skin. It does so by breaking down the skin’s collagen and elastin causing wrinkling.

Ultraviolet light also stimulates pigment production (tanning), which is the skin’s way of trying to protect its deeper layers from the damaging effects of UV rays (burning). This pigment can often be blotchy and irregular.

With that in mind, it’s easy to see that many skin conditions typically thought of as “age related” are actually “sun damage” related. And while sun damage typically increases with age, giving some truth to the idea that blotchy, wrinkled skin is ‘old’ skin, sun protected skin will stay younger looking even into old age. Proof; take a peek at the sun protected skin of the buttocks and compare this to the face or forearms. The skin is the same age, but has had vastly different sun exposure. Hence the sun exposed skin seems “aged” in comparison.

Now let’s look at some conditions that can affect your skin over the years. Be sure to visit a Board Certified Dermatologist if you have concerns about any of the following;

20s – 30s 

Melasma: This blotchy brown spots on upper lip, cheeks, and forehead is sometimes called the “mask of pregnancy” due to hormonal influences on pigment production. This can happen during pregnancy or while on birth control pills. Sun protection is an essential part of treatment which can also include skin lightening agents such as topical hydroquinone and retinoid creams. For stubborn melasma, laser treatments can be helpful in addition to topical medications.

Acne Rosacea: Best known as “adult acne” this can involve breakouts and facial flushing in response to triggers such as sun exposure, overheating, spicy foods, red wine, and stress. Daily sun protection helps minimize redness as does recognizing and minimizing triggers. Your doctor has several treatment options if these initial steps are not enough to stop the breakouts and flushing.

40s – 50s

Fine lines & Wrinkles: Ultraviolet light slowly breaks down collagen and elastin fibers and reduces the skin’s elasticity. Sun protection is key to preventing this, but use of topical vitamin C, peptides and retinoids can be helpful. Resurfacing treatments such as chemical peels or fractional laser peels are also effective.

Expression Lines: Over the years expression lines can become etched into the skin by the repeated movements of facial muscles. These are easily remedied by injecting small amounts of purified botulinum toxin protein to soften the pull of the muscles. Chronic sun damage tends to exaggerate these expression lines due to the loss of the sun damaged skin’s elasticity.

Man with sun damage to one half of his face due to his occupation as a driver. It shows how the sun damage ages the skin, not just age!

60s – 70s 

Brown Spots: Freckles & spotty discoloration of the skin are caused by long term sun exposure. These are sometimes called ‘liver spots’ due to their brown color. Sunscreen is the best prevention, but treatments similar to those mentioned for Melasma can be very helpful.

Dryness: The hormonal changes during and after menopause can result in reduced facial oil production and dryness of the skin. Cream based moisturizers rather than lotions are most helpful.

Facial Volume Loss: Over time, the apples of the cheeks can lose their roundness, especially in slender women. The sunken facial appearance can be corrected with injections of volumizing fillers, such as Sculptra or Radiesse. These fillers stimulate collagen production under the skin restoring a natural fullness.

Disclaimer: The information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem.

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Inside Coolibar Sunscreens and Lotions

Don’t be fooled by sunscreen labels any longer!

This April Fools, we’re not fooling around – at least about sunscreen. Almost two years after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced their new sunscreen labeling requirements (first announced June 14, 2011), we’re now seeing both small and large sunscreen vendors roll-out new labeling, packaging, and in some cases, improved products. These changes will allow consumers to better understand a sunscreen’s ability to protect against UVA and UVB sun damage, skin cancer and skin aging.

Our friends at the American Academy of Dermatology did an excellent job of outlining many of these changes:

Skin cancer prevention versus sunburn protection

On the label, you’ll see whether a sunscreen can:

– Help prevent skin cancer and sunburn.

– Only help prevent sunburn.

That’s thanks to new FDA testing requirements. For a label to claim that a sunscreen can help prevent skin cancer and sunburn, it will have to pass two tests.

1. The first test is the broad-spectrum test. This test shows whether a sunscreen can protect your skin from the sun’s UVA and UVB rays. Both rays can cause skin cancer.

2. The second test is the sun protection factor (SPF) test. This test shows how well a sunscreen protects you from sunburn. Like today, you’ll see the SPF as a number, such as SPF 30. All sunscreen must offer some SPF. The minimum is SPF 2.

New warning: For a sunscreen to carry the claim that it can prevent skin cancer and sunburn, it must offer both: 1) broad-spectrum coverage and 2) an SPF of 15 or higher. If the sunscreen does not offer both, the label will have to carry this warning:

“This product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging.”

Water resistance

The FDA will ban companies from claiming that a sunscreen is “waterproof” or “sweat proof.” This is simply not possible.

You’ll now see the term “water resistant.” To make this claim, the product must pass another test. This test shows how long a sunscreen keeps its SPF when a person goes in the water or sweats. The label also must state how long the water resistance lasts, either 40 or 80 minutes.

New warning: If a sunscreen is not water resistant, the label must carry a warning. This warning will tell you to use a water-resistant sunscreen if you are likely to sweat or be in water.

Makeup and moisturizers

You’ll see the new claims on makeup and moisturizers, too — provided the product undergoes and passes the FDA tests.

Vanicream SPF 50+No ratings above SPF 50+

A proposed rule, if enforced, will limit the maximum SPF value on sunscreen labels to “50 +” because there is not sufficient data to show that products with SPF values higher than 50 provide greater protection for users than products with SPF values of 50.

All Coolibar sunscreen brands will be making changes to their packaging to be in compliance with new FDA guidelines.  For example, Vanicream SPF 60 will be replaced by Vanicream SPF 50+. If you have any specific questions about your favorite sunscreen brand sold on http://www.coolibar.com/, ‘Leave a reply’ below or comment at http://www.facebook.com/coolibar

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SunAWARE

3 Personal New Year’s Resolutions to Stay Skin Cancer Free in 2013

When thinking about your 2013 New Year’s Resolutions, consider making a conscious effort to prevent skin cancer in 2013. Yes, skin cancer is preventable in many cases. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. More than 3.5 million skin cancers in over two million people are diagnosed annually (Skin Cancer Foundation).

Prevention starts with education, and knowing exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVA – aging, and UVB – burning rays) from the sun and tanning beds contributes to your risk of developing skin cancer. The good news is an individual can take simple steps to ensure a lifetime of healthy skin and still enjoy everything the outdoors has to offer.

3 Simple New Years Resolutions for Healthy Skin in 2013:

1. Use Sun Protection (Photo: Raw Elements SPF 30 Sunscreen)

1. Incorporate sun protection into your daily routine.

Use sun protection every day of the year. Even if you are indoors, windows allow UVA rays to penetrate the glass (glass blocks UVB rays). Start by incorporating sunscreen into your daily routine. Apply broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher on your face and all exposed skin. If you wear makeup, apply a face sunscreen underneath your foundation even if your foundation has SPF, as most people don’t use a thick enough application to provide adequate sun protection. (Click here for dermatologist recommended face sunscreens.) If you’ll be outdoors for an extended period of time, wear a wide brim hat, UV400 sunglasses and UPF 50+ sun protective clothing. If you cannot wear sun protective clothing, apply sunscreen underneath your T-shirt since most regular clothing offers less than SPF 30 protection. Not only will this keep your skin healthy, but as added incentive, you’ll look younger longer since UV rays significantly contribute to visible signs of aging.

2. Perform a self skin exam

2. Perform a self-skin exam every month and track your mole changes.

You know your body best, so you’ll likely be the first to notice changes in the skin. Also, when caught early, skin cancer is easily treatable in most cases. This is why performing a self-skin exam is important. Print this body map from the Skin Cancer Foundation and then look for the following:

1. A skin growth that increases in size and appears pearly, translucent, tan, brown, black, or multicolored.

2. A mole, birthmark, beauty mark, or any brown spot that: changes color, increases in size or thickness, changes in texture, is irregular in outline, is bigger than 6mm or 1/4”, the size of a pencil eraser, appears after age 21.

3. A spot or sore that continues to itch, hurt, crust, scab, erode, or bleed.

4. An open sore that does not heal within three weeks.

If you notice any change in an existing mole or discover a new one that looks suspicious, see a physician immediately.

If you’re more of an smart phone app aficionado, technology is making performing a self-skin exam an exceedingly simple task. Check out smart phone apps on the Coolibar Pinterest page.

3. Get a full-body skin cancer screening (Photo: Charles Crutchfield III, M.D., M.B.B., F.A.A.D.)

3. Make time for a full-body skin cancer screening with a board-certified dermatologist once per year.

While you should check your skin every month, a board-certified dermatologist that works with skin every day may notice changes that you didn’t. Schedule an annual skin cancer screening to ensure your skin is healthy as can be!

The American Academy of Dermatology designates the first Monday in May as Melanoma Monday (5/6/2013). Dermatology offices often provide free skin cancer screenings. Find a free skin cancer screening on the AAD website or by calling your local dermatology office. Mark your calendars now!

Have a great 2013 and keep your skin healthy!

– Coolibar, Sun Protection You Wear

DisclaimerThe information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem.

What are your 2013 New Year’s Resolutions? Join the conversation on the Coolibar Pinterest page!

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What's Hot

Coolibar Holiday Gift Guide

Destination holiday — living healthy and giving healthy. At Coolibar we have a gift-worthy idea — sunwear to go everywhere and do anything! We have sun protective clothing, sun hats, UV swimwear, sun shelters, UPF 50+ umbrellas and skin care perfect for women, men and children, all items for those who love spending time under the sun! Take a look and share our gift guides with your family and friends to drop the hint.

Shop Coolibar.com. Search Coolibar.com for your gifts by name.

Questions? Call 1.800.926.6509

Enter our contest to win a Coolibar UPF 50+ Titanium Beach Umbrella and Sand Anchor (a $100 value)! Keep it for yourself or give it as a gift. Visit our contest page for details.

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Coolibar Athletes

Equipment Fit for the Coolibar Athlete

Looking to start a new sport, or possibly update your current fitness gear?

Run, hike, bike, ski, golf, swim and surf in the same equipment Coolibar athletes use to reach new heights! Coolibar athletes participate in a number of sports and fitness activities to stay in shape.

To see what our athletes recommend for your specific interests click the first image below and scroll through the following collages: #1 Running – Kristie Cranford; #2 Hiking / Adventure Racing – Jeremy Van Ek; #3 Golf – Elena King; #4 Windsurfing – Marion Lepert; #5 Skiing – Tania Prymak; #6  Biking and Running – John Barker; #7 Swimming – Molly Baross

[nggallery id=31]

Coolibar is not affiliated with any other brand or product depicted in these collages other than the Coolibar branded clothing and sunscreens.

Shop Coolibar UPF 50+ Women’s Clothing

Shop Coolibar UPF 50+ Men’s Clothing

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Apply Sunscreen SunAWARE Sunscreens and Lotions

Pampering Your Skin on Airplanes

Way up high in the sky your skin goes to battle with re-circulated dry air and an extra dose of sunlight. These elements leave skin near lifeless by the time you land. Never fear! We have suggestions to save your skin (all 3.4 oz or less of course).

Airplanes have low-humidity. Drinking water and avoiding alcoholic beverages can help retain moisture, but it only goes so far.  Additionally, daytime flyers are exposed to UVA – aging rays (all glass will filter UVB (burning) rays). An airplane’s proximity to the sun intensifies UVA exposure. The American Optometric Association estimates a 4% increase in UV radiation with every 1000 feet of elevation, and most commercial aircrafts fly between 30,000 to 40,000 feet above ground. Holly extra UVA!

Step off the plane looking and feeling great by keeping these simple tips and products in mind:

SUNSCREEN

Your number one skin saver should be sunscreen. Not only are most sunscreens moisturizing, but they’ll help prevent skin from absorbing aging rays!

Our favorite moisturizing sunscreens:

Cotz Face SPF 40, 1.5 oz. (matte finish) – $20

Blue Lizard SPF 30+ Face, 3 oz. – $10

Badger Unscented SPF 34, 2.9 oz. – $16

 

SUNGLASSES

If UVA reaches your skin, it reaches your eyes too. Look for shades that block 100% of UVA and UVB or are rated UV400. Sunglasses may help keep your eyes moist too!

Coolibar UV Sunglasses – $49 to $119

 

LIP PROTECTION

Your lips have some of the thinnest skin on your body. Because lips do not contain oil glands, they tend to dry out easily and become chapped. Additionally, the sun only causes chapped lips to worsen. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends applying a lip balm or lipstick that contains sunscreen rated SPF 15 or higher.

Our favorite SPF lip balms:

Vanicream Lip Protectant SPF 30, 0.35 oz. – $5

CoTZ Lips SPF 45, 0.14 oz. – $7

 

LOTION OR HYDRATING MIST

Spritzing will help your skin stay moist temporarily, but it’s not a necessity. Future Derm beauty blogger Nicki Zevola and guest blogger Jana Levin have two varying opinions on when to use hydrating mist. 1) Before take-off lightly spray the mist on your face and apply sunscreen over top; or 2) when arriving at your final destination remove all makeup and sunscreen, give your skin a spritz and then reapply sunscreen.

Our favorite hydrating products:

Blue Lizard Sorbolene Cream, 2 oz. – $14

Galen Labs Hydrosols (travel size 5 pack) – $16.99

Colorescience Pro Achromatherapy Gem Spritzers, 4 oz. (you’ll have to use this one before or after travel) – $10 to $35

Soothing Travels!

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Events SunAWARE

Raw Elements Narragansett Surf Event

Take a moment to Hang Ten with Coolibar and Raw Elements

The Waterman Eco Challenge held on July 21st in Rhode Island, an event created as a weekend dedicated to ocean and sun safety put on by Coolibar sunscreen vendor Raw Elements, was a great success!  An estimated 10,000 people were on the beach that day most cheering on the competitors racing to paddle out past the break.

A recap of the day from Brian Guadagno, Founder of Raw Elements USA, Sr. Lifeguard Captain, Narragansett Surf Rescue:

“What a great summer day with sunny skies, what more could you ask for? How about 3-4 foot NE wind swell! The conditions definitely added to the energy of the day and the event. It was so great to see so many men and women come out and paddle! The event is all about you guys and we were so stoked on the turn out and how well everyone did under the conditions. For some, it was business as usual getting out past the break. For others, it was likely the first time they had attempted that and everyone battled and didn’t give up. Everyone made it out and it was awesome to hear the crowd cheering on and rooting for every last paddler until everyone was on their way. I know there were a number of paddlers who were stoked to get out there and paddle but opted not to because of the conditions. We all totally respect knowing your personal limitations and taking a responsible approach toward ocean safety. There were a number of close finishes and the competition was really tight! We were thrilled to have everyone make the 2nd annual Waterman Eco-Challenge the day it was! We are already excited and looking forward to planning next year’s event!”

All beach goers also had the opportunity to learn the 5 easy steps of SunAWARE at the Raw Elements tent, where sunscreen samples and SunAWARE materials were available.

P.S. The lifesaving team was protected by these Coolibar men’s and women’s rash guards.

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Wellness Warriors

Five Olympic Athletes Take the Gold for Sun Safety

Not all athletes, including Olympic athletes, are into tanning, even though a Google image search of the word “athlete” displays an overwhelming number of tanned muscle men and women. Being fit and looking great doesn’t mean you need tan skin. In fact, you’re likely to develop sun spots and wrinkles if you do tan. To dispel the tan athlete typecast, we went out in search of Olympic athletes spreading the word about using sun protection for a healthy sunny life. In our opinion, these five women get the Gold for their sun protection efforts.

Kerri Walsh (Photo credit Jasonschock, Wikipedia)

Kerri Walsh, Beach Volleyball (USA)

At age 34, Walsh has taken home two gold medals for beach volleyball. Being a native of California she also knows the importance of using sunscreen when playing on the beach. Quoted in Fitness Magazine online, she says, “My mom had skin cancer on her chin, so I know that sun protection is important.”

Christine Rampone in yellow (Photo credit Brittany Carlson, Wikipedia)

Christine Rampone, Soccer (USA)

When two-time Olympic Gold medalist Rampone, 37, is on the soccer field she may be focused on the game, but she always uses sun protection before heading out on the field. “I apply sunscreen about an hour before practice, and I get one with as high a SPF as I can find- at least 35, usually a 50,” she says on the Skin Cancer Foundation website. As captain of the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team she leads by example for her team as well as the youth she coaches in her spare time.

Natalie Coughlin (Photo credit JD Lasica, Flickr)

Natalie Couglin, Swimmer (USA)

As a swimmer and 11-time Olympic medalist, at age 29 Couglin is wise beyond her years to use sweat- and water-resistant sunscreen in the water and encourage others to do so. During her interview with Marie Claire, she says “I’ve been in the sun my whole life, and fortunately, I’ve been obsessed with wearing sunscreen since I was a kid.” Couglin uses the Vertra Face Stick with SPF 38 is her choice as her water-resistant sunscreen go-to.

Victoria Pendleton (Photo credit johnthescone, Wikipedia)

Victoria Pendleton, Track Cyclist (U.K.)

Pendleton, 31, is a nine-time world champion and was an Olympic gold medalist in individual sprint at the Beijing Olympics in 2008. She uses sunscreen on her face and body, and her complexion shows it! “My go-to sunscreen for my face is Elemis Liquid Layer SPF 30. For my body, I like to use a sunscreen from Soleil Organique,” she says in Marie Claire.

Gisela Dulko (Photo credit Pascalre, Wikipedia)

Gisela Dulko, Tennis (Argentina)

Dulko, 27, is a former women’s doubles world No. 1 and has won 17 doubles titles. Playing tennis outdoor for a living she’s exposed to the sun for extended periods of time. She keeps her skin naturally beautiful by wearing sunscreen. “I don’t wear any makeup when I play matches, only sunscreen—Avène SPF 30 for face and body,” says Dulko in Marie Claire.

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Apply Sunscreen SunAWARE Sunscreens and Lotions

EWG Sunscreen Ratings

Have you heard of the Environmental Working Group (EWG)? The mission of the EWG is to use the power of public information to protect public health and the environment. One of the EWG’s specialties is providing useful resources to consumers such as information on the safety and effectiveness of sunscreen ingredients. Coolibar sunscreens are top-rated by the EWG for broad-spectrum protection with fewer hazardous ingredients.

The EWG says, “the best sunscreen is a hat and a shirt. No chemicals to absorb through the skin, no questions about whether they work. But when you can’t get away from exposing your skin to the sun, use broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) protection with fewer hazardous chemicals that penetrate the skin…All EWG top-rated products contain either zinc or titanium minerals to help cut UVA exposures for sunscreen users.”

EWG’s 6th annual analysis of sunscreens includes safety and effectiveness ratings for 1,800 SPF products (that’s 100 more than last year)! Their ratings are based on an in-house compilation of standard industry, government and academic data sources and models that the EWG has constructed over the past seven years, and on a thorough review of the technical literature for sunscreen. Read more on EWG’s sunscreen rating methodology.

We’ve taken the time to list Coolibar sunscreens that are considered to be safer broad-spectrum options by the EWG, so you can easily find the perfect sunscreen.

EWG Top-Rated Coolibar Sunscreens (listed alphabetically)

All Terrain

All Terrain Aquasport Performance Sunscreen, SPF 30 (Score: 2)

All Terrain KidSport Performance Sunscreen, SPF 30 (Score: 2)

All Terrain TerraSport Performance Sunscreen, SPF 30 (Score: 2)

 

Badger

Badger Baby Sunscreen, SPF 30+ (Score: 1)

Badger Sunscreen Face Stick, Unscented, SPF 30+ (Score: 1)

Badger Sunscreen, Lightly Scented Lavender, SPF 30+ (Score: 1)

Badger Sunscreen, Unscented, SPF 30+ (Score: 1)

Badger Sunscreen Lip Balm, Unscented, SPF 15 (Score: 2)

 

Blue Lizard

Blue Lizard Australian Suncreen, Face, SPF 30+ (Score: 2)

 

Cotz

Fallene Cotz 20% Zinc Oxide Vanishing Formula Pure Mineral Sun Protection, SPF 35 (Score: 2)

Fallene Cotz Face Water Resistant Sun Protection, SPF 40 (Score: 2)

Fallene Cotz LipCotz, Ultra High Sun Protection, SPF 45 (Score: 2)

 

Raw Elements USA

Raw Elements USA Eco Formula, SPF 30+ (Score: 1)

Raw Elements USA Eco Stick, SPF 30+ (Score: 1)

 

Solbar

Solbar Shield Sunscreen, SPF 40 (Score: 2)

 

Vanicream

Vanicream Sport Sunscreen Lotion, SPF 35 (Score: 2)

 

Search for a specific sunscreen on the EWG website.

Download the FREE EWG Sunscreen Rating App for iPhone® on iTunes®.

Shop all sunscreens at Coolibar.com.

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Coolibar Athletes Routinely Check Skin Wellness Warriors

Coolibar Athlete Kristie Talks Melanoma Prevention

This is a special blog post from Coolibar Athlete Kristie Cranford and her words-to-the-wise regarding Melanoma and how you can protect yourself. She speaks from personal experience.

Melanoma-n. 1.  –mas also –mata: a usu. malignant tumor containing dark pigment. 2. Deadly Skin Cancer. The one that won’t leave me alone.

When you get up in the morning, you get dressed, right? Shirt, pants, shoes?  You wouldn’t leave the house naked, would you? But sadly many do. Many leave the house without sunscreen. Sunscreen should be an essential part of your wardrobe.

I am a multiple melanoma (skin cancer) survivor. You never think you will ever hear the words “You have cancer” once in your life, let alone time, after time, after time, like I have. My first and most advanced was discovered during a routine annual exam. It was in the center of my back. I had no way to knowing it was there. Undetected, it would have killed me, I was only 27. I had an area the size of a small nerf football removed from my back because of a mole the size of a pencil eraser. Melanoma  is the most deadly form of skin cancer.

Here are some statistics:

  • In 2012 more than 116,000 people will be diagnosed with the disease
  • By 2012, it is estimated that one in 50 people will be diagnosed with melanoma
  • One person dies nearly EVERY HOUR from melanoma
  • Melanoma affects people of every age and every race
  • The incidence rate for children 18 and under INCREASED by 84% from 1975 to 2005

Many cases of skin cancer can be prevented and detected early.  Here are the ABCDEs of melanoma:

Asymmetry:  One half of the mole does not match the other half

Border:  The borders of the mole are irregular, ragged, blurred, or a notch

Color:  The color of the mole is not the same throughout. There may be brown, black, red, blue, or white.

Diameter:  The mole is larger than 6 millimeters (roughly ¼”, roughly the size of a pencil eraser)

Evolution:  The mole has been growing or changed its shape and color.

Protect yourself anytime when outdoors, rain or shine. Don’t just avoid peak sun exposure hours between 10am and 4pm. Water, Sand and Snow reflect the sun’s rays. Wear sunscreen with an SPF factor of 30 or higher, remember to reapply. My favorite is Raw Elements USA. The Eco Stick can be easily applied under water and over sweat. Smaller than an energy gel, it’s easy to carry.  Look for sun protective clothing like Coolibar. Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from ocular melanoma. AVOID TANNING BEDS.  Apply sunscreen before placing your hands under the UV rays at the nail salon (bet you NEVER thought about that). Visit a trained dermatologist annually for a complete, head-to-toe exam.

I used to be bitter and angry with Melanoma. I was angry that it was determined to kill me. Then I realized. It saved me. I took back my health. Over time I started eating right, running, and having routine exams and screenings. I credit Melanoma for saving my life. Without it, I would not have detected my breast and cervical cancers in the early stages. I am living breathing proof that early detection is the key to survival.

As athletes we train and compete outdoors. We take precautions to train smart and eat right to prevent illness and injury. Please, don’t forget your skin.

Information, statistics, and ABCDE’s obtained via www.OutruntheSun.org

Visit Kristie’s Blog Here: http://coachkristie.com/2012/07/03/melanoma/

Read Kristie’s full cancer stroy here: http://www.prsfit.com/blog/cancerversary-n-1-_____-2-the-anniversary-of-my-first-cancer-diagnosis/

Visit Coolibar for sunscreen and sun protective clothing: www.coolibar.com

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