Archives

SunAWARE

Does the Ozone Hole Affect Your Health?

In the upper atmosphere, about 6 to 30 miles above Earth, naturally occurring ozone protects life from the sun’s ultraviolet B radiation (UVB). This is known as the stratospheric ozone. Over decades, it has been damaged by cumulative pollutants including motor vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions, gasoline vapors, chemical solvents as well as natural sources. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), nontoxic, nonflammable chemicals containing atoms of carbon, chlorine, and fluorine, which were once used as refrigerants and in spray cans, have been pinned as the main culprit. Over the past 20 years, a significantly depleted layer of ozone known as the ozone hole has formed over the Antarctic. This ozone loss imposes a serious health threat for humans, in particular our skin and eyes.

“The more damage there is to the ozone layer, the more UVB rays that reach our bodies,” claims Dr. Herman and Dr. Newman, atmospheric physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Both UVB rays and UVA rays cause DNA damage in the skin that can lead to skin cancer, premature skin aging, cataracts and other eye conditions. Exposure over time can also weaken the immune system. The good news is that world political and environmental leaders are working together to address this issue.

Since 1987, over 150 nations have gradually signed the Montreal Protocol, which now prohibits the production of ozone-depleting CFCs. After over two decades of international collaborations to restore Earth’s sun protective layer, studies are showing a gradual decrease in harmful CFC levels in the atmosphere. Presently, the ozone hole is no longer expanding and evidence suggests it’s on the mend.  According to Dr. Herman and Dr. Newman, scientists currently estimate that stratospheric ozone levels in the northern mid-latitudes will recover by 2050 and polar levels by 2065, which could significantly reduce the incidence of ultraviolet radiation exposure health related issues for future generations.

It will take time for the stratospheric ozone to recover. Luckily, we  have options to protect our skin, eyes and health by taking a holistic approach to sun protection starting today. SunAWARE’s advice: First, avoid unprotected UV exposure and seek shade when possible. Keep in mind that UV doesn’t flow in one direction. It is able to bounce off surfaces, molecules and particles, so even when you’re under an umbrella, UV can still reach you.  Second, wear sun protective clothing, wide-brim sun hats and UV sunglasses. These items are your best defense to keep UV from penetrating your skin and eyes. Next, apply SPF 30+ broad-spectrum sunscreen everywhere clothing doesn’t cover. This practice should be included into your daily regimen in order to decrease the repercussions of cumulative UV skin damage. Finally, routinely check your skin for suspicious changes and see a dermatologist if you notice anything. Pass on this wisdom and educate others about the need for sun protection.

Resources:

http://www.nzdoctor.co.nz/news/2011/november-2011/01/uv-index-replaced-by-alert.aspx

http://www.epa.gov/glo/

http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/10/21/scientist-speaks-out-after-finding-record-ozone-hole-over-canadian-arctic/

http://www.epa.gov/airtrends/aqtrnd95/stratoz.html

http://ozonewatch.gsfc.nasa.gov/facts/hole.html

http://www.skincancer.org/ozone-and-uv-where-are-we-now.html

1 Comment
Educate Others SunAWARE

Don’t Burn. Learn About the UV Index.

Looking up the UV Index is as important as looking up the weather online or watching the morning forecast every day.  Just like the weather forecast, the UV Index forecast tells you what to wear. In addition, it indicates how you should prepare for the sun’s intensity so you can feel comfortable and keep your skin protected while outside.

Over-exposure to UVA and UVB rays from the sun can cause more than painful sunburn. Repeat exposure to the sun’s harmful UV rays over time can cause premature aging of the skin and contribute to your risk of developing skin cancer. The UV Index predicts UV intensity levels on a scale of 1 to 11+, and the higher the UV Index number is, the greater risk you’re at of damaging your skin. The Index takes into account clouds and other conditions that affect the amount of UV radiation reaching the ground.

 

Exposure
Category
Index Number Sun Protection Measures
 LOW  <2 Wear sunglasses that block 100% of UV. If you burn easily, cover-up and use broad-spectrum sunscreen SPF 30+. In winter, reflection off snow can nearly double UV strength.
 MODERATE  3-5 Take precautions if you will be outside, such as wearing a wide-brim hat and sunglasses that block 100% of UV and using broad-spectrum sunscreen SPF 30+. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
 HIGH  6-7 Protection against sun damage is needed. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses that block 100% of UV, use broad-spectrum sunscreen SPF 30+ and wear a long-sleeved shirt and pants when practical. Reduce your exposure to the sun’s most intense UV radiation by seeking shade between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
 VERY HIGH  8-10 Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A tightly woven shirt (or sun protective clothing), wide-brim hat and broad-spectrum sunscreen SPF 30+ are a must, and be sure you seek shade.Beachgoers should know that white sand and other bright surfaces reflect UV and can double UV exposure.
 EXTREME  11+ Protection against sun damage is needed. If you need to be outside during midday hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., take steps to reduce sun exposure. A tightly woven shirt (or sun protective clothing), wide-brim hat and broad-spectrum sunscreen SPF 30+ are a must, and be sure you seek shade.

 
If your local weather channel doesn’t announce the UV Index, you can get your local UV Index on the Environmental Protection Agency’s SunWise webpage. For smart-phone and tablet users, there are also UV Index apps available. Just search “UV Index” when in your app store. Look up your UV Index right now by entering your zip code into this UV Index widget.

By taking a few simple precautions daily, you can greatly reduce your risk of sunburn and causing permanent skin damage. At Coolibar, we like to use the SunAWARE acronym to explain the simple steps you can take to stay sun safe every day:

SunAWARE Logo

No Comments
Expert Rx

Dermatologists, More than Pimple Popping M.D.s

Dermatologists are medical doctors who specialize in treating skin, hair and nails. According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), at any given time, one out of every three people in the United States suffers from a skin disease.  Many skin conditions cannot be cured or relieved with over-the-counter treatments. For skin conditions that are out of your control or you’re not sure what to do about, make an appointment with a board-certified dermatologist. Depending on your specific skin problem, you may even wish to search for a dermatologist online and find a doctor that specializes in specific areas, such as cosmetic procedures, skin cancer or skin of color.

Dermatologists are way more than “pimple popping M.D.s”, which according to the popular ‘90s sitcom Seinfeld is all the profession is good for. They save and improve lives every day by helping people get control of their problematic skin, hair and nail conditions.

Seinfeld Clip “Pimple Popping M.D.s”

Still not sure if you should seek medical attention? Here are some of the top reasons to see a dermatologist.

Acne. For acne that is not responding to an over-the-counter skin treatment, a dermatologist can determine which kind of prescription skin treatment would be most effective for your acne and lifestyle.

Eczema. Many people suffer from eczema, a chronic condition characterized by irritation, itchiness, and flaky patches of skin. A dermatologist can help find ways to manage this condition and, if necessary, will prescribe medications.

Skin cancer. An annual full body skin exam performed by a dermatologist is especially important if you are in a high-risk group (fair skin, had bad sunburns, especially blistering sunburns, skin that burns or freckles rather than tans, 50-plus moles or atypical moles). In addition to regular screenings, you should see a dermatologist if you notice a change in the shape, size or coloring of any of your moles. A dermatologist can remove some or all of the suspicious tissue, then examine it under a microscope for cancerous cells. Skin cancer does not discriminate. All ages and races are susceptible to skin cancer.

Wrinkles, dark spots and scars. If you are concerned about minimizing skin damage or caring for aging skin, a dermatologist can suggest products or lifestyle changes that reduce your exposure to damaging elements. They can also perform cosmetic procedures to reduce visible signs of aging and scars.

For almost any condition that affects your appearance (skin, hair and nails) you can seek a dermatologist for advice and treatment. For a complete list of the conditions dermatologists treat, please visit the AAD website.

Take care of your skin, your largest organ. Remember, everyone needs sun protection, but those with skin conditions may be even more sensitive to the sun. When talking with your dermatologist, ask him or her about photosensitivity (a negative skin reaction to UV rays) and get sun protection recommendations.  Using sun protective clothing, wide-brim hats, sunglasses and broad-spectrum sunscreen regularly can reduce visible signs of aging and help prevent skin cancer.

Photo courtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives.

Disclaimer: The information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem.

2 Comments
Expert Rx Videos

Medications and Sun Sensitivity (Video)

Hi, this is Dr. Davis for Coolibar Sun Protective Clothing.  I wanted to talk to you today about conditions of the skin that can make you more sensitive to the sun.  You might be surprised to hear that some of the things dermatologists prescribe to help improve your skin can actually make you more vulnerable to sunburns, such as medications for acne, tetracycline, doxycycycline while great for calming down other conditions; you might notice that you sunburn a lot easier when you’re taking those things.  When you are prescribed a medication by your doctor, and if you have any questions, certainly ask about sun sensitivity potential.  It might be something that is easily forgotten we don’t necessarily think about that, but in the summer especially when a doctor prescribes certain medications, for blood pressure… acne…it is something to be mindful of.  We’ve had people who started new medications, went out to a ball game and got a sunburn unexpectedly where they normally wouldn’t have, so it can make a big difference.  So, don’t forget to ask about sun sensitivity.

The other thing is there are certain medical conditions that can make you skin just intrinsically more sensitive.

Lupus – is actually triggered by sun exposure, ultraviolet light exposure, if your genetically prone to it

Vitiligo – which is a condition where you lose pigment in certain areas, those areas don’t have the ability to tan, they cannot protect themselves, so you have to do that for your skin.

…and there are several others, but just be sure that you ask those questions to your doctor.

What consequences could this medicine have?

What should I do if I have Lupus? And the basic things we’ve talked about in terms of sun protection are essential for those conditions.

Be SunAWARE and Be Safe!

Disclaimer: The information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem.

No Comments
Expert Rx

Sun Protection Following Cosmetic Procedures

Dr. Shauna Kranendonk is a board-certified dermatologist in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, who specializes in cosmetic and surgical dermatology and has been in private practice since 2000. Dr. Kranendonk’s knowledge in cosmetic dermatology is recognized nationally. In the past year, she has co-authored two textbook chapters, including “Skin Rejuvenation” in the surgical textbook Cosmesis of the Face and Jaw, and “Proprietary Peels” in the dermatology textbook Chemical Peels. Dr. Kranendonk shares her expertise with Coolibar on how to avoid scarring, age spots, new lines and wrinkles by using sun protection after chemical peels and laser treatments.

Everyday patients come into my office looking for ways to look younger.  For skin that is weathered from years of sun exposure, I recommend chemical peels and laser treatments.  These procedures can be performed on virtually any area of the body but most commonly are performed on the face, neck, chest, arms and legs. 

When educating patients about these treatments, I can’t emphasize enough the importance of sun protection, in the form of sunscreen and sun protective clothing. The healing process for peels, varies from 3-7 days.  Laser resurfacing is typically 7-10 days for face, longer for chest and lower extremities. Sunburn during the healing stage can result in scarring.  In addition, patients who don’t properly protect their skin from the sun following chemical peels or laser procedures are at risk for developing dark patches of skin in the treated areas. This complication is known as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.  With treatment, it can take up to several months to resolve.  It is much easier to prevent this complication by avoiding sun exposure during the healing phase. 

The benefits of peels and procedures don’t wear off after a given length of time.  What I tell patients after their procedure is, we’ve turned the clock back, and now it starts ticking again.  Good sun protection will keep the clock ticking at a slower rate and sun exposure will speed it up.

Sun protective clothing helps keep the skin safe from sun exposure following skin rejuvenation procedures.  Sun protective clothing has the unique advantage of being a broad spectrum physical block, which won’t sweat off like sunscreens will.  In addition, many sunscreens sting and burn when applied to the skin, especially following chemical peels or laser treatments, and they don’t provide sufficient sun protection.  Sun protective lightweight breathable fabrics, such as Coolibar SUNTECT® fabrics, help keep the skin from overheating, providing comfortable, safe sun protection.  With sun protective clothing, sun-related complications can be avoided.  And, you can keep your skin healthy and beautiful for years to come.

Shauna Kranendonk, MD
Coastal Dermatology Cosmetic, Laser & Surgery Center

Disclaimer: The information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem.

Radiant Sun Protection
No Comments
Inside Coolibar

Coolibar Sun Protection – 10 Years of Innovation!

Believe it or not, it’s Coolibar’s 10th birthday! In September 2001, native Australian and company founder John Barrow signed the documents to start Coolibar and bring Australia’s advances in sun protection to America. We’ve taken huge strides over the years: introduced numerous innovative fabric technologies, raised our standards in sun protective ratings, designed a variety of UPF 50+ apparel, now more stylish than ever, and helped to establish a new movement where people are incorporating sun protection into their daily lives.

Coolibar Sun Protective Clothing Company Timeline

We have more people working at Coolibar than ever before with exciting new ideas for the upcoming year…but we won’t give all of our plans away just yet. We want to thank all of our loyal customers for 10 wonderful years and we hope to stay in touch!

– The Coolibar Team

See How Our Catalog Covers Have Evoloved!

[nggallery id=23]

1 Comment
Parenting

Abbey’s Hope On Pool Safety

Abbeys Hope Logo

Here at Coolibar we work hard to educate adults and kids about the importance of staying SunAWARE. Our friends at Abbey’s Hope, a local Minnesota non-profit, are just as serious about pool safety. Abbey’s Hope was created in honor of Abbey Taylor, a young girl whose tragic story inspired thousands of families and companies to give pool safety the attention it deserves.

As the summer winds down, you may be hitting the pool or beach for a few last days of fun in the sun. You’re most likely going to pack along your broad-spectrum sunscreen and Coolibar gear to help keep you safe from the damaging effects of UV. Besides avoiding nasty sunburn, Abbey’s Hope wants to make sure you don’t forget the other important ways you can remain safe at the pool. 

Abbey's Hope Pool Safety Event
Abbey's Hope Pool Safety Event (Photo courtesty of Abbey's Hope Facebook Page)

One way the organization educates our local community is by producing and sponsoring a number of fun events that help families learn to enjoy the pool in a safe way. Often partnering with other great non-profits, such as the YMCA, Abbey’s Hope has reached thousands of children, including the 2,400 kids they helped provide with water safety lessons and the 150 children who received a new swimsuit as a result of their “Bowling for Swimsuits” event.

Abbey’s Hope is a great source for information about how to stay safe at the pool. Some of the helpful pool safety tips they suggest are:

  • If you’re in a group, appoint a designated “water watcher,” taking turns with other adults.
  • While supervising, stay alert and avoid distractions like reading or the telephone.
  • Teach children how to tread water, float, and get out of the pool.
  • Tell children to stay away from pool and hot tub drains.
  • Never dive in to water less than nine feet deep.
  • If you find a drain cover that is loose, broken or missing, notify the owner or operator and do not enter the pool or hot tub.
  • Learn infant and child CPR.

The biggest fundraising event of the year for Abbey’s Hope is their Annual Golf Tournament, taking place September 12, 2011. The event helps raise money so the organization can continue its mission to make pools safe and to educate kids and adults about all the ways to have a fun, safe day at the pool. Because sun safety is an important and vital part of pool safety, this year Coolibar will be participating in the Golf Tournament by providing an information table with materials about how to stay SunAWARE.

If you’d like to learn more about Abbey’s Hope or how to participate in the Golf Tournament, please visit their website at http://abbeyshope.org/.

Safely Swimming for Abbey's Hope
Safely Swimming for Abbey's Hope (Photo courtesy of Abbey's Hope Facebook Page)
2 Comments
SunAWARE

Beat the Heat Wave

With temperatures indexing over 100 degrees Fahrenheit in at least 20 states across the country, the ongoing heat wave has been making more than headlines. The extreme heat and humidity have caused serious health problems for many individuals, including heat cramps, heat exhaustion and fatal heat stroke for those who haven’t taken the proper precautions. Most heat disorders occur from being overexposed to heat or over-exercising. Older adults, young children, and those who are sick or overweight should take extra precautions.

Beat the heat over the following week by taking simple steps to stay cool.

– Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun.

– Stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine if air conditioning is not available.

– Consider spending the warmest part of the day in public buildings with circulating air.

– Eat well-balanced, light, and regular meals. Avoid salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.

– Drink plenty of water. Persons who have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention should consult a doctor before increasing liquid intake.

– Limit intake of alcoholic beverages.

If you must work or go outside:

Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight, and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Despite conventional wisdom that we put on long-sleeves and pants to warm up when cold, we can do the same to cool off when the sun causes us to overheat.

– Protect face and head from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat. Choose a hat with a 3” brim or greater.

– Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.

Construction Workers Bear the Heat
Construction Workers Bear the Heat

Visit FEMA to learn more about signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke and see all of their suggestions on how to prepare for extreme heat.

‘Leave a Reply’ below or post a comment on Facebook to ask Coolibar experts how to choose the best UPF 50+ apparel and hats to stay cool outdoors.

1 Comment
Apply Sunscreen Expert Rx Parenting Sunscreens and Lotions

Sunscreen Tips for Toddlers

Summer is the perfect time for the pool, playgrounds and sun-filled activities. Fortunately, with good sun habits, children can enjoy sunny days outside without risking their health. Just one blistering sunburn in childhood more than doubles your chances of developing melanoma later in life. And unfortunately, 54 percent of children burn or tan in their second summer, and 22 percent burn in their first, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

Board certified Pediatric Dermatologist Dr. Manju George specializes in personalized care for infants, children and young adults.  She understands that kids have unique dermatologic requirement because “children are not just small adults.”  Dr. George offers advice on how to keep your kiddies protected from the sun’s rays by knowing what to look for in sunscreen, how to use it, and how to add fun to habits so that your kids will enjoy sunscreen time.

Dr. George’s Sunscreen Tips

1. LOOK AT THE LABEL. A lot of parents assume, well, the higher the SPF, it must be better. What you really want to look for is the ingredients in your sunscreen. What I recommend is zinc oxide or titanium dioxide [These are physical sunscreen ingredients.] Choose an SPF of 30 that’s labeled broad spectrum. That means it protects against both UVA and UVB rays.

2. AVOID SPRAY ON SUNSCREENS. The major drawback of an aerosol sunscreen is that it could get into the eyes or inhaled by a child, and we really don’t have the long-term data on those effects.

3. USE GENEROUS AMOUNTS ALMOST EVERYWHERE. One of the biggest mistakes parents make is number one: not applying enough sunscreen. Apply sunscreen 30 minutes before leaving the house, no matter what the weather. Even on a cloudy day, you still get 80 percent UV exposure. Start with the neck down, make sure you cover thick and evenly on all areas of the body, not forgetting the ears, backs of the hands, crease of the neck, underarms, between the fingers, underneath the bathing suit. After you’ve covered those major areas, you should do the face last.

4. REMEMBER THE LIPS AND SCALP. The lips need protection as well. Another tip that I give parents is to put it in his or her part line. But one of the best ways to protect scalps is to actually purchase a hat.

5. MAKE APPLYING SUNSCREEN FUN! I like to call it your magic cream or magic lotion. Children like making it special. Don’t make it a chore. One mom actually told me she uses a paintbrush and has the child paint the sunscreen on themselves. Another thing that children really like to do, is they like to apply it on you, so let them apply it on Mom or Dad. They tend to be much more receptive when you do things together and you make it a fun activity for them.

Parents, it’s up to you to keep your little ones protected from the sun, so keep Dr. George’s advice in mind during outdoor playtime. To best protect your child from the sun, cover them with a hat, pants and long sleeve shirt, apply sunscreen every two hours or after sweating or swimming and limit time outside when the sun is strongest (between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.). Have fun making fun with sunscreen!

Disclaimer: The information provided by Coolibar and its contributors is general skin care information and should not be a substitute for obtaining medical advice from your physician and is not intended to diagnose or treat any specific medical problem.

Dr. Manju George - Pediatric Dermatology West Palm Beach
Dr. Manju George - Pediatric Dermatology West Palm Beach, FL
No Comments
Parenting School sun safety SunAWARE

Meet Our 2011 School Sun Hat Contest Winners

The 2011 Coolibar School Sun Hat Contest had over 750 entries from students, teachers, PTA members, and nonprofit organizations from across the US. We even had a few entries from Australia!  Thanks to the efforts of the five lucky winners, entire classrooms of students will be able to safely enjoy the summer sun, and stay well protected beneath their new Coolibar Sun Hats!  

And the winners are …

4th Grade - Notre Dame Academy
4th Grade - Notre Dame Academy

Nicholas from Notre Dame Academy – Los Angeles, CA 

Every student from Notre Dame Academy’s fourth grade class entered the Coolibar Sun Hat Contest, but Nicholas was the lucky winner. The students were able to put the hats to good use during the many end of year activities at Notre Dame Academy. A walking field trip, an end of year picnic, and an annual school camping trip gave the kids plenty of chances to practice sun safety while wearing their new Sun Hats.  

  

Anna from Goddard Pre-school
Anna from Goddard Pre-school

Anna from Goddard School – PA 

Every year Anna’s family goes on vacation to St. Thomas, and they always stock up on sun protective clothing because the whole family is fair skinned, especially young Anna. They got the entry form for the School Hat Contest with an order from Coolibar and decided to enter. Anna’s whole class is very glad she entered the contest because during the summer, they spend a lot of time exercising and enjoying snacks outside.  Goddard’ s Parent Teacher Organization has been trying to obtain large sun shades for the playground for the past few years; however, the cost of these sun shades are beyond their budget.  In the meantime, the school is planning on using portable gazebos to give the children a place to cool off while they are playing, or even to gather while they have story time. And now, thanks to Anna, they’ll get the benefit of great sun protection from their new Coolibar Sun Hats!

 

4th grade Baldwin School students wearing their new Coolibar Sun Hats
4th grade Baldwin School students wearing their new Coolibar Sun Hats

Gayle from the Baldwin School – Bryn Mawr, PA   

Gayle is a 4th grade science teacher at the Baldwin school, a college prep school for girls. She entered the Coolibar Sun Hat Contest because she believes that living a sun safe lifestyle starts at a young age. She hasn’t always believed that, though.  “I grew up in an era where we used sunTAN lotion, not sunscreen lotion, with the resulting negative effects on my skin.  Who knew? So [now] I wear sun protection clothing all the time,” says Gayle. The students appreciate the protection from the hats, but they especially love that the Sun Hats match their school uniforms perfectly!

 

5th Grade – Cesar Chavez Elementary

Kinsey from Cesar Chavez Elementary – Davis, CA   

Cesar Chavez Elementary is a Spanish Immersion school for grades K-6, and is one of the largest elementary schools in Davis. The kids had a “play day” at the end of the school year where they spent about 4 hours outside. With their new Coolibar Sun Hats, now they’ll be getting superior sun protection while enjoying the sun!

 

Emily Coolibar Hat
Emily in her new Coolibar Hat

Emily from New Albany Elementary – New Albany, OH 

Emily was very excited to win sun hats for her class, because she already wears Coolibar products on family trips to Florida and family cruises. She was so happy to share the quality sun protection that our Sun Hats offer with her classmates and teacher, especially after she saw how much they all loved the hats. New Albany Elementary is part of New Albany-Plain Local Schools, which is a community of schools housed on an 80 acre college-style campus. The kids were looking forward to wearing their new hats during a walking field trip on their beautiful campus, ending with an ice cream treat. Unfortunately, the weather had different plans, and with the rainstorm they got that day, they probably could have used a few Coolibar Titanium Travel Umbrellas! Though the weather in Ohio hasn’t been very sunny lately, the kids are all looking forward to wearing their new Coolibar Sun Hats on the hot, sunny summer days ahead.

Look for our 2012 contest form next year.  In the meantime, learn more about the Coolibar School Sun Hat Program.

 

No Comments