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This is Brave

Be Brave: A Week of Gratitude


As a part of Melanoma Awareness Month, we’d love to hear and share your Coolibar gratitude throughout the month of May! Make sure to tag us on social media for a chance to get featured.

From: Michelle, Coolibar

“As a parent, I’m so grateful that I have learned how to keep my kids sun-safe. Before working at Coolibar I depended on sunscreen alone and spent so much time battling to reapply it. Now my kiddos see themselves as Coolibar sun protection ambassadors. They’re always wearing their UPF 50+ gear and are constantly asking me for ‘swag’ for their friends and their teachers. They’re 8 and 10, but already understand the importance of teaching other to be sun safe”

From: Kelsey, Coolibar

“As an avid golfer growing up, I used to only apply sunscreen at the beginning of every round but would always forget to reapply. I had no idea how bad that was for my skin. I’m truly grateful of the awareness and knowledge that working for Coolibar has given me. One of the great things about our UPF 50+ protection is that I don’t have to worry about reapplying it. I feel confident golfing and doing other outdoor activities when wearing Coolibar because I know that I’m sun-safe!”

From: Laurie, Warrior

“When I was first diagnosed with melanoma, I quietly rearranged my personal life to fit the sun’s schedule. I was afraid of the sun! Sun protective clothing has been a Godsend. I can get out and golf, ride bikes and enjoy the pool with my grandchildren. I’m finally learning to get back in the sun.”

From: Kani, Sun-Safe Mom

“Living in Southern California as a busy mom, it’s very hard to shelter myself from the sun. I just want to say that Coolibar’s neck scarves are absolutely amazing! I have them in several colors and can’t wait to buy more!”

Our year-round mission is to protect the world from sun damage. During Melanoma Awareness Month, we show additional support to our community with our ‘Be Brave’ campaign! We are determined to change the one in five statistic of people developing skin cancer in their lifetime.

You can help support life-saving research, education and awareness by donating to the Melanoma Research Foundation

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Avoid UV & Seek Shade SunAWARE

Can You Get Sunburned Through a Window?

It’s no secret that exposure to the sun when outdoors for an extended period of time can cause damage to and sunburn your skin. But can you get sun damage through windows? The answer may surprise you. 

Practicing sun safety is essential for avoiding sunburn and minimizing your risk of developing wrinkles and, more seriously, skin cancer. There are many myths surrounding whether or not you can get sunburned through windows or if you can tan through a window. While it may feel like you are protected from the sun when behind windows indoors or in a car, this is not the whole story. 

Can You Get Sun Damage Through Windows?

The answer to this question comes down to whether or not UV light can go through glass. It depends on the type of glass the window is made of, and not all windows are the same when it comes to UV protection. Ultraviolet Rays are light waves from the sun and can reach us in sneaky ways. We need to worry about two types of UV rays: UVA and UVB rays, because they can reach the earth.

  • UVA Rays: longer wavelength rays that are less intense but penetrate deep into the skin and cause tanning. UVA rays are responsible for skin aging and wrinkles due to the fact that they break down collagen fibers, which help with skin strength and elasticity. UVA rays can contribute to skin cancer.
  • UVB Rays: shorter wavelength rays that penetrate only the superficial layers of the skin. UVB rays are more intense and harmful to the skin’s DNA and are responsible for sunburn. This type of light ray also stimulates the body to produce vitamin D and is believed to cause a higher percentage of skin cancer.
Visual representation of the question can UV go through glass

Can You Get a Tan Through a Window?

Since ultraviolet rays do pass through glass, most commonly the UVA rays, there is a chance that you can get a suntan through a window. It will, of course, depend on the length of exposure, but since UVA rays are not blocked by most glass, you may get sun damage and a slight tan. However, it is not likely that you can get sunburned through a window due to the UVB protection present in most windows.

sun shining through a car window

Can You Get Sunburned Through a Car Window?

Do car windows block UV? Not all car windows are equally protective, and this is due to legal reasons. Your car’s windshield is required to offer more protection to prevent the glass from shattering in case of an accident. 

This extra protection also means better UV filtering. Your car’s windshield is treated against the sun’s UVA and UVB rays, while the rest of your car’s windows only filter against UVB rays. 

As we know, UVA rays cause damage to your skin at a deeper level. Since your windshield only filters out UVA rays, you will still get UVA exposure from the other windows in your car. You might not get a sunburn in your car, but that doesn’t mean you aren’t getting skin damage. 

  • UV rays can go through car windows, but not all UV rays can
  • Your car’s windshield offers the best protection against UV rays (UVA and UVB)
  • UVA rays can still penetrate the other windows in your car, causing skin damage and aging
  • Since UVB rays are filtered by all car windows, it is unlikely that you can get burned through a car window

Sun Protective Solutions

While sun protection may not be at the top of your list when preparing for long road trips in the car, there are a few simple steps you can take to mitigate skin damage from the sun

  • UPF Clothing: arguably the easiest way to reduce skin damage is to wear UPF clothing daily 
  • UVA protective film: extra tints or films can be added to your car windows to block out those UVA ray
  • Sunscreen: incorporating a daily sunscreen into your routine can go a long way in preventing sun damage, especially those parts of your body that are most often exposed like your face, hands, and arms
sun through window shining on a woman reading

Can You Get Sunburned Through Other Windows? 

What about other windows – can you tan through a house window? Can you get sunburned through a window at home? Are you inadvertently getting sun exposure at work

We know that UV rays can go through glass, but it depends on the type of glass.

Standard construction windows in your home or office will offer good protection against UVB rays, so it’s unlikely that you will get sunburn through a window. Most windows do not offer protection against UVA rays, although if your windows are newer there’s a chance that the UVA protection is better. Solar window screens and treatments are a good option for cutting down harmful UV rays from the sun.

  • Windows at your home or office may block some, but not all of the sun’s UV rays. 
  • While it’s not likely that you’ll develop a sunburn through a window, you may still be getting sun damage from UVA rays.
  • Window screens or blinds can help reduce the UV rays getting through.

Sun Protective Solutions

It can seem nearly impossible to avoid sunburn and other types of skin damage from the sun, but a few quick adjustments you can make in your everyday life will significantly impact your overall skin health. 

  • UPF Clothing: the best barrier option for your skin to prevent damage and easy to incorporate into your day-to-day
  • Sunscreen: reduce UV exposure to your skin by wearing sunscreen daily
  • Sunglasses: wear polarized sunglasses year-round to protect your eyes from harmful UV rays
Women wearing sun protective clothing

Learn More About Coolibar’s UPF 50+ Clothing

Even though there’s only a small chance that you can get a sunburn inside, that doesn’t mean you aren’t still getting sun damage. UVA rays that are most likely to get through your car windows or windows at home are linked to skin damage, aging, and even skin cancers. You may feel a sense of protection from that layer of glass in your car window, but the only way to ensure you are protected is to incorporate sunscreen and UPF clothing into your daily routine. 

Sun protection is serious business. At Coolibar, we stop at nothing to develop the most technical and elegant sun protection you wear. The world leader in UPF 50+ fabric technology. Discover more sun tips on our blog, and shop our latest UPF 50+ clothing.

Women’s UPF Clothing

Men’s UPF Clothing

Kids & Baby UPF Clothing

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Experts Say Live Wisely

10 Ways to Safely Enjoy the Sun

Between soccer games, outdoor concerts, travel and everyday moments, we are experiencing life outside more than ever. So, how can we develop a healthy relationship with the sun and stay safe? Experts recommend you start with these top 10 steps for protecting your family and preventing sun damage:

1. WEAR A WIDE-BRIMMED HAT WHENEVER POSSIBLE

One of the most common places for skin cancer is on the human scalp. A wide-brimmed (3-inch or greater) hat covers places where it is difficult to apply sunscreen, such as the tops of the ears and the back of the neck.  – Skin Cancer Foundation

2. WEAR UV-BLOCKING SUNGLASSES

Ocular melanoma is the most common primary cancer of the eye in adults. Always wear high-quality UV-protective sunglasses whenever outdoors. Good sunglasses should block 100% of the sun’s UV spectrum – Ocular Melanoma Foundation

3. PROTECT YOUR SKIN WITH TRUSTED, TRIED AND TRUE UPF 50+ CLOTHING

Clothing is the best means of sun protection. Choose garments with an Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) label of 50 or higher to block 98% of all UV rays. A standard white cotton T-shirt will have a UPF of 5-7.  – Skin Cancer Foundation

4. DON’T GET BURNED!

What we call sunlight is technically ultraviolet radiation (UV Rays). In addition to cosmetic concerns like premature aging, wrinkling, leathery skin and unattractive sun spots (90% of which are caused by UV rays), UV rays alter our molecular structure and cause deep damage and skin cancer. In other words—don’t get burned! – American Cancer Society

5. WEAR GLOVES OR SUNSCREEN ON YOUR HANDS YEAR-ROUND

The backs of your hands, like your face, get sun exposure every day. The result: thinning, crinkled skin, dark spots, and skin cancers. Wear gloves or sunscreen year-round.  – Skin Cancer Foundation

6. ALWAYS WEAR THE RIGHT CLOTHES WHEN OUTDOORS

The heat can tempt you to shed clothes, sacrificing sun safety for comfort.  UPF clothing is made of lightweight, high-tech fabrics specially treated to be “breathable” and “sweat-wicking”. – Skin Cancer Foundation

7. WHETHER YOU’RE ON A PLANE, TRAIN, CAR OR BOAT, COVER UP

By law, most front windshields in cars are treated to filter out most UVA rays, but side and rear windows generally aren’t. If you’re flying to your vacation and love the window seat, know that UVA rays come through airplane windows. To be safe, wear sunscreen and sun-protective clothing anytime you’re traveling. Skin Cancer Foundation

8. DIVERSIFY YOUR SUN-PROTECTION ROUTINE

Because exposure to UV light is the most preventable risk factor for all skin cancers, everyone should protect their skin from the sun’s harmful UV rays by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing and using a sunscreen of SPF 30+ on exposed areas. American Academy of Dermatology

9. PROTECT YOURSELF ON OVERCAST DAYS

NEW: Up to 80% of the sun’s UV rays can pass through clouds. This is why people often end up with serious sunburns on overcast days if they’ve spent time outside with no sun protection. –Skin Cancer Foundation

10. SHARE YOUR SUN-SAFE HABITS WITH OTHERS, ESPECIALLY CHILDREN

One blistering sunburn can double a child’s lifetime risk of cancer. Protect them with lightweight and breathable sun-protective clothing, ideally long-sleeves and long pants in bright colors. Cover eyes with UV-blocking sunglasses and scalps and necks with broad-brimmed hats with brims 4” around or greater. – Skin Cancer Foundation

 

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Sun Tips (Attachment)

 

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Behind The Design Experts Say

UV Rays in the Fall Can Be as Damaging as in the Summer

Leaves turn colors, temperatures start to cool, the sun’s heat wanes, and instinctively we drop our guard and “forget” sunscreen, leave our hats at home and waltz out into the day’s rays utterly unprotected. Is it really necessary to stay vigilant with UV protection? Are we truly risking the sun’s wrath if we sit beachside with our book or enjoy our morning cup of coffee on the terrace? Or is this UV stuff all hype?

The answer is simple and surprising. Yes, it’s necessary to stay vigilant even though it feels cooler outside. Science is very clear that the harshest of rays, UVB (“B” helps you remember for Burning) change in intensity based on the season and the position of the sun. But, UVA rays (emphasis on “A” for “Aging”) remain strong in full force with fearless intensity year-round, regardless of season or the sun’s position. These rays will undermine mind all your protective measures unless you stay on it. In short, UVA rays are incredibly powerful rays that never go away, constantly and cumulatively wreaking havoc with skin health, contributing to skin cancer, vision loss and reducing our immunities. While it may seem excessive to wear UPF 50+ clothing covering arms, faces, and heads in these cool fall days, a simple neighborhood walk, a casual bike ride, a lunch al fresco or a play day at the park adds up to long-term irreversible cellular damage. So, yes, keeping your guard up and staying protected is a year-round gig.

Omnipresent and relentless in their reach, the relatively long-wavelength UVA accounts for approximately 95% of the UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface and thus our skin. Although UVA is generally far less carcinogenic than UVB radiation, it’s present more abundantly in sunlight than UVB radiation and contributes appreciably to the carcinogenicity of sunlight. UVA penetrates into the deeper layers of the skin where connective tissue and blood vessels are affected. As a result, the skin gradually loses its elasticity and starts to wrinkle. Furthermore, recent studies strongly suggest that it may enhance the development of skin cancers. The mechanisms of this UVA damage are not fully understood, but a popular hypothesis assumes that UVA increases oxidative stress in the cell.

Think of UVA as a sneaky, ill-intentioned ninja, stalking their prey (your skin) and never letting up. They penetrate your car windows, but you don’t see them; they’re invisible. They damage skin, but don’t feel them because they don’t burn. But, within a number of years, you start to see the effects of UVA’s work. Freckles pop up on your chest, wrinkles and brown spots appear, jowls and neck skin droops, collagen and elasticity diminishes. Even more serious concerns occur, like vision issues, eye cataracts, and macular degeneration. Or, most serious of all, cancer happens. While UVA isn’t the primary source of cancer, it is a known contributor. And, the simple and unprotected daily commutes and errands in the car, shuttles of kids to soccer or long walks on a warm fall day accumulate and become irreversible UVA damage.

For nearly 20 years, our focus on protection with UPF 50+ clothing was laser-pointed at people who’ve encountered a real medical concern, like cancer, sun allergies, Lupus, chemo treatment, prescription medications that create sun sensitivity. So our broad-spectrum UV fabrics have been specially developed to authentically protect those in need and attack UVB because of its evil results while also pushing back on UVA rays. With stylish, intelligent clothes that block UVA/UVB, a Coolibar tee-shirt looks and feels like any tee-shirt, and with incredible intent. You’d have no idea our tee was a hard-working UV blocking shirt; it’s as soft as a cotton tee and feels wonderful. This strategy has been essential to many customers, because nearly 70% buy Coolibar because of a medical issue, and they want to avoid visibly publicizing their health situation. So our design philosophy has been to develop highly technical fabrics in elegant, comfortable clothes and swimwear that look great. Candidly, we’ve never talked much about UVA. We’ve always blocked UVA, but we’ve never really emphasized these rays, until now. Today, with a company mission that emphasizes keeping people safe from UV damage, we need to be more assertive about prevention as much as we’ve designed for protection. We want to start younger, get people paying attention to skin health. This commitment is our version of “an apple a day.” What’s our answer to powerful UVA rays this fall? How can you start your prevention regime?

We’ve developed a proprietary year-round fabric derived from the Merino sheep in New Zealand. It’s a fantastic blend, machine washable and super comfortable, and we’re not just saying that because we developed it. The Coolibar Merino Wool is an ultra lightweight, comfy, super breathable UPF 50+ fabric that insulates on chillier days and cools on warmer days, and, equally important, it tells UVA rays to bounce off (putting it politely). It’s light enough for men who fear sweater weather; it travels; it’s a lightweight fabric that’s a heavyweight UV fighter. Tested and endorsed by dermatologists and holds The Skin Cancer Foundation seal of recommendation, our Coolibar Merino Wool blocks 98% of UVA and UVB rays and does it in a collection of fall wraps, pullovers, sporty polos, long cardigan-style sweaters, scarves, designed to cover arms, necks, hands and look perfect for the season. Being based in Minnesota, we revel in all outdoor seasons. Our entire company actively participates in outdoors year-round activities. We wear test our products for technical performance, styling, wear-ability, fit, comfort and durability. If we were pushy and not Minnesota nice, we’d highly suggest you wear a quality, high-end sunscreen, always protect your eyes with the best sunglasses you can buy (please avoid the glasses from the dime store; their lens effectiveness degrades) and wear UPF 50+ clothing that makes hiding from UV rays look and feel good.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.who.int/uv/faq/whatisuv/en/index2.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10907526

 

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Experts Say

What are ultraviolet rays?

Scientifically speaking, UV radiation is part of the electromagnetic (light) spectrum that reaches the earth from the sun. It has wavelengths shorter than visible light, making it invisible to the naked eye. These wavelengths are classified as UVA, UVB, or UVC.

UV Radiation and Skin Cancer
By damaging the skin’s cellular DNA, excessive UV radiation produces genetic mutations that can lead to skin cancer. Both the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the World Health Organization have identified UV as a proven human carcinogen. UV radiation is considered the main cause of nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These cancers strike more than a million Americans each year. Many experts believe that, especially for fair-skinned people, UV radiation also frequently plays a key role in melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. One person each hour dies from melanoma.

UVA Rays
Most of us are exposed to large amounts of UVA throughout our lifetime. UVA rays account for up to 95 percent of the UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface. Although they are less intense than UVB, UVA rays are 30 to 50 times more prevalent. They are present with relatively equal intensity during all daylight hours throughout the year and can penetrate clouds and glass.
UVA penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB and is responsible for skin aging, wrinkling (photoaging) and breaking down collagen. Recent studies over the past two decades show that UVA damages skin cells called keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. (Basal and squamous cells are types of keratinocytes.) UVA contributes to and may even initiate the development of skin cancers.
UVA is the dominant tanning ray, and we now know that tanning, whether outdoors or in a salon, causes cumulative damage over time. A tan results from injury to the skin’s DNA; the skin darkens in an imperfect attempt to prevent further DNA damage. These imperfections, or mutations, can lead to skin cancer. Tanning booths primarily emit UVA. The high-pressure sunlamps used in tanning salons emit doses of UVA as much as 12 times that of the sun. Not surprisingly, people who use tanning salons are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma. According to recent research, first exposure to tanning beds in youth increases melanoma risk by 75 percent.

UVB Rays
UVB, the chief cause of skin reddening and sunburn, tends to damage the skin’s more superficial epidermal layers. It plays a key role in the development of skin cancer and a contributory role in tanning and photoaging. Its intensity varies by season, location, and time of day. The most significant amount of UVB hits the U.S. between 10 AM and 4 PM from April to October. However, UVB rays can burn and damage your skin year-round, especially at high altitudes and on reflective surfaces such as snow or ice, which bounce back up to 80 percent of the rays so that they hit the skin twice. UVB rays do not significantly penetrate glass.

 

If you’d like to read more information about ultraviolet rays visit the Skin Cancer Foundation website.

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Educate Others SunAWARE

Skin Cancer Rates Rise in US Hispanic Demographic

It’s still a common misconception that darker skin tones are not at risk for skin cancer. The Hispanic population is the fastest growing ethnic group in the US. Unfortunately, along with this increase is an increase in the rate of skin cancer among its members. An unwarranted confidence in skin color may contribute to a lack of compliance with sun safety techniques–possibly one reason for the rapid rise in melanoma and other skin cancers.

A study from the Cancer Institute of New Jersey concluded that there is a lack of skin cancer prevention interventions targeting this community. Sunscreen use in the Hispanic population is also low. More than 43% of Hispanics never use sunscreen. While this group does produce extra melanin (which is a natural UV protector), sun safety is still important. Additionally, 89% of Hispanic women have never had a conversation with their doctor about melanoma.

So what can we do to change this? We can educate. Inform everyone that wearing sunscreen daily and sun protective clothing is important for all ethnicities. Year-round sun protection (yes, even in the winter), skin checks and awareness can benefit of all of us.

Be SunAWARE and Be Safe!

Read more on this topic here: Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

Resources: Skin Cancer Foundation & Latin Times

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Coolibar Athletes

Become a 2014 Coolibar Sponsored Athlete

Happy 2014! Are you looking for a challenge in the New Year to help reach your fitness goals? Consider becoming a 2014 Coolibar Sponsored Athlete.

Our athletes are fitness fanatics who are also concerned about sun safety. Whether your life is at the water, on the mountain, or on the court, we want to know about the extraordinary things you’re doing outdoors, protected by Coolibar of course, and share it with our sun-loving community. So bring on the sunshine, because it’s no match for Coolibar athletes.

Still not convinced? Hear from a few of our former athletes.

Sevve Stember, 2013 Athlete

I thought the whole athlete sponsorship program was super fun and it was really inspirational to be part of.” – Sevve Stember

Molly Baross, 2012 Athlete

“I loved being an athlete representative for Coolibar. My teammates were envious of my sun-protective clothing!”Molly Baross

Kristie Cranford, 2012 Athlete

“I am truly happy and lucky to have had this opportunity. I am deeply saddened it has come to an end.” – Kristie Cranford

Now accepting 2014 applications. Apply Now to become a 2014 Coolibar Sponsored Athlete.

Learn more about the program on our FAQ page.

Read about our 2013 Athletes.

Application deadline is midnight CST on Sunday, January 26, 2014. Can’t wait to meet you!

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What's Hot

Taking Beauty on the Road

First food, then fashion, now skin care. “Beth’s Beauty Bus” is a mobile skin care boutique with cosmetics, skin care, hair products and personal consultation from esthetician founder Beth Ross, who preaches the importance of sun protection (that’s why she carries our line). We love this concept and wanted to learn more.  Beth graciously agreed to share her story.

Why did you start Beth’s Beauty Bus?
As a practicing Esthetician, I know the best route to great, glowing skin is to have a great home routine with the correct skincare products. By creating the first-ever retail mobile beauty bus, I can see more customers in different parts of LA versus a brick and mortar shop.  Most of all what is truly satisfying is seeing how happy people are with the results.

How long have you been doing it?
Beth’s Beauty Bus got rolling in October 2013.

Beth Ross, founder of Beth’s Beauty Bus

Are there certain groups or areas that request your presence?
My age group ranges from teens to baby boomers because every age has skincare issues.  My physical bus stops:  ALL of Los Angeles.

What are customers most interested in?
Without a doubt, it’s “Anti-Aging”.  And every woman wants to get the “dew” touch look which is why hydration is so critical to the home regime

Are visitors aware of the importance of sun protection? Do they know about sun protective clothing?
Unfortunately, no. People are surprised when I tell them about Coolibar.

Do you have a busy time of year?
It is busy all year long due to our climate and everyone is trying to either get younger or stay younger!

Do you have any quick tips for skin care?
Remember every ripple makes a wave, it is the combination of doing a lot of simple habits that make the recipe for beautiful skin work.  Here are a few basics;

1. Change your pillow case. This is a game changer. Shampoo, hair spray, oil and dirt from our hair travels to the pillow case.  At night, while we change sleeping positions, our face rolls around and marinates with these products and environmental debris.

Here is the pillow case recipe: On Sunday, put a fresh pillow case on. Then Monday, reverse the pillow case out.  Tuesday, do a fresh new pillow case.  Wednesday is the reverse day.  And so on throughout the week.

2. Dedicate one towel for hand washing and another one for the face. I would change both daily if possible.

3. Wash your hands BEFORE you wash your face. The correct amount of time to wash your hands is the length of the song “Happy Birthday to You”. Wash the tops of the hands, inside the fingers, nails and wrist area.  Most people wash the inside portion of the hands.

4. Turn the faucet off with a paper towel. Remember you turned the faucet on with dirty hands.

Anything else you want to share with our readers?

Once a week, apply a mask.  Everyone’s first response is; “I don’t have time”. I suggest applying the mask on Sunday while you do the laundry.  We have a client who now keeps her jar of mask in the laundry room.  She told me, “It’s next to the soap that way I do it”. Smart gal!

If you are in the LA area, look  for Beth’s Beauty Bus. Check out the recent coverage on KTLA.

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Videos What's Hot

Stress Free Travel Tips

Flying soon? Whether you’re en route to Grandma’s or a family vacay in Hawaii, you’ll more than likely have to battle the airport during the holiday season, which happens to be the busiest time of the year. The long lines are inevitable, but a few shortcuts can help expedite the travel process. We’ve compiled a list of travel tips so you can relax and focus on the good stuff.

 

Packing

      • Travel light. It’s difficult to lug around a heavy suitcase, especially in holiday crowds.
      • Pack smart. Bring items that can do double duty. For example, the Coolibar Ruche Water Jacket can protect you while swimming and be a great throw on for touring around town.
      • Roll your clothing, don’t fold. Packing your clothing neat and efficiently will save room in your suitcase. Our friends at Momtrends offer up the “clothing sandwich” method.

Plan

  • Plan your travel day ahead of time to reduce stress and ensure you catch your flight.
  • Arrive at the airport at least 2 hours early. The holiday season is a busy time, which means long lines.
  • Watch the weather. Depending on where you live (or are going) weather will be a factor in what you bring.

Traveling with kids

  • Bring new toys and books, something that they have never seen before will hold their attention. Tablets are great to play games and watch favorite movies.
  • Don’t forget snacks! Use snacks they are familiar with, don’t rely on airport food.
  • More tips for traveling with kids.

Beat the heat

  • Drink fluids. Just because you aren’t thirsty, doesn’t mean your body doesn’t need water; by the time you feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated.
  • Prevent sunburn. There are few better ways to ruin a vacation than painful burn! Wear sun protective clothing and a hat and remember to reapply sunscreen every 2 hours.
  • To beat the heat in style, choose from our new head-to-toe UPF 50+ travel outfits that will take you anywhere.

We want to hear your travel tips! Use #CoolibarVacay to share yours.

Sources:
http://www.wired.com/geekmom/2012/05/travel-tips/
http://www.weather.com/activities/travel/vacationplanner/destination/tips/traveltips_holiday.html

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